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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been building bikes for the last 50 odd years. This is my latest project. I bought it about 12 months ago as a non goer. It was missing a few bits, badly rusted steel bits, oxidised ally bits and the last owner apparently only had a hammer and chisel. Chain had come off at some stage and wrecked the crankcase, compression was down to 65 and 80 psi. Auto advance was a bodged up homemade job about 60 degrees out. Carbs were gunked up along with oil filters. Plan was to Cafe it. I do everything myself: Welding, painting, machining, polishing, anodising, electrical, mechanical, upholstery and so on. I'm retired so plenty of time. This project will be my last, I can't ride anymore due to chronic RA, so the project will continue as long as I can. Here's some pics of what I started with and where I'm up to with the build.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I never bothered to start the TX when I got it home, I put a compression gauge on it, the compression was down to around 65 in one, 80 in the other, so I never bothered trying to start it. Instead, I pulled the motor and stripped it down, this is what I found: the auto advance unit was a homemade, bodged up thing, cam chain was stretched, putting the timing out by around 60 degrees. Cam chain guide and adjuster were worn through, carbs were full of gunk, valves seats were pitted, there were a couple of missing pins behind the star on the shifter drum, so no gears, clutch basket was grooved, oil filters were totally gunked up, starter gear spring was loose, there were numerous leaks, the crankcase above the drive sprocket had been torn off, the bearing mount for the shifter drum was damaged, drive sprocket teeth were non existent and the retaining nut looked like Arny had got stuck into it with a sledge.

I had the barrel rebored two sizes over, had the valve seats reground, then sent off for some new parts: new pistons, rings, gudgeons, clips, cam chain guides, auto advance unit, carb kit, new second hand crankcases, gasket kit, seal kit, stainless allen kit, cam chain and probably a few other bits and pieces that I can’t remember now. I had the oil pipe re chromed along with points and auto advance cover. Manufactured a sump filter guard. The rocker shaft bungs are stainless bungs I found on ebay for a fraction of the price of OEMs.

While I was waiting for the parts to arrive, I blasted the cases, barrel, head, rocker cover, and carbs, cleaned them out afterwards with a pressure cleaner about a dozen times. Blew every orifice out at least two dozen times with compressed air and once satisfied they were clean and free of grit I painted the cases, barrel, head and rocker cover silver, polished the side covers, valve caps, dipstick, starter ends, cam chain adjuster housing and breather box, made new pins for the shifter drum, reworked the starter gear spring and started putting it back together in a stand I made for the job.

Once it was all back together, I didn’t fancy starting the motor up on the bench and watch it vibrate itself onto the floor, so I made another stand, with wheels and a rudimentary ignition system. I spun the motor over with my Milwaukee 18 volt drill for a few minutes to get the oil circulated, bolted on what was left of the two into one exhaust, filled the tank, switched it on and hit the starter button. I wasn’t expecting this, but as soon as I hit the starter button, the damn thing roared into life. And by crikey these things are shakers, with the motor going it started walking its way around the workshop, so I pulled out some rope and tied it to the bench grinder stand, then it just jumped up and down every time I gave it a handful. Of course, the carbs were way out of sync, so I put together a manometer and synced the carbs.

End of the engine story: Well, not quite, I thought the motor just looked so bland, so I pulled it apart again, stripped the silver paint off and painted the cases, head, barrel, rocker cover and carb bodies black, polished the carb caps and float bowls then put it back together again with new gaskets. And lo and behold, after priming it, it started straight away again. All good except for a small leak at the base of the barrel. I haven’t fixed that yet, instead concentrating on the frame and fittings.

So, that was the easy bit, the cycle parts have proved never ending, but that's alright, I enjoy my time in the workshop. Being a DIY kind of guy, I insist on doing everything myself, the only diversion from that was taking the frame out for blasting. So to come: New exhaust, seat pan with cowl, ally battery carrier, ally side panels, modified guards, ally tail light, ally brake anchor, stainless brake linkage, ally engine mounts, ally remote filter housing and mounting hardware, risers, cable splitter, ally coil mount, mods to the frame for side panel tabs and battery box mounting, modified fork legs, painting, and did I mention polishing, lots and lots of that: rims, hubs, forks, tree, brake collector, risers, side panels, tail light, battery box, battery retainer, brake ancho, brake backing plate, dust covers, wheel spacers, carbs, valve covers, breather box, cam chain adjuster, carbs, side covers, PMA mount, starter ends, dipstick, remote filter and cooler fittings. In between jobs it was back to the engine for a PMA mount, reg/rect mount, single point conversion, carb sync adjusters, plus a few more bits and pieces.

I can never ride the bike, it’s just a workshop project, so there is no end planned. I’m reaching the end of my time anyway, so after I’m gone the wife can sell it and maybe get some bucks for it, along with all my tools and machinery. I’d really love to take it all with me, but I’ve been told that’s simply not feasible!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I wanted to replace the steel handlebar mounts on the Tx with some nice ally risers, but couldn't find any I liked so I made my own from a slab of ally I bought for the job. They came out pretty good Inthink.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cable splitter. The TX came with a silly twin cable throttle, one cable for each carb. I binned that bought a single cable throttle andI made this cable splitter from a small lump of ally, turned up the end caps and the slide, then dunked it in my anodising bath. I also made up some cable adjuster screws and brackets which attach to the top of the carbs to make syncing easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I decided to convert the electro magnet alternator to a PMA, but balked at the price of a kit. I could have searched for a second hand rotor, stator and banshee mount, but none of the wreckers around me had any, plus, who knows what you're getting with 40 year old second hand parts. I searched ebay and found a new rotor for a Banshee and a stator and reg/rect for an XV, all for $130Aust. I then bought a slab of ally for a few bucks and turned up a mount for it. A lot better than a dodgy, cut down Banshee mount. To time the new PMA I timed it with the original alternator, bringing the pointer on the rotor around to the timing mark, then removed it being careful not to disturb the timing. I then installed the new PMA, made up a pointer plate and afixed it to the side cover, installed the side cover then scribed lines on rotor and pointer plate. Prior to installing the stator on the mounting plate I polished it, this helps the lektrisity flow smoother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Single points conversion. I wanted to simplify the points system, but I do like mechanical things, so decided to convert the twin points to a single points system. There was a cam available for this conversion, but apparently they weren't very accurate, so I decided to make my own. First order of business was a backing plate which I made from some 3mm thick steel, shaped it on the lathe, filed cutouts for the minting screws and drilled and tapped the plate for points and lube felt.

Next I turned down some stock to 18mm, bored it 8mm, filed the ramps, then cut the keyway. Nope, timing was way off. Did it this way for a few attempts without luck. So, I decided to do it in reverse: Cut the keyway, mount the round stock on the advance rod, time the engine, gap the points, set the points at the midway position and mark where the heel of the points counted the round can and file the ramp. Success, I managed to get the timing for number one cylinder spot on with the correct dwell after only a few files. Next I rotated the cam 180degrees and did the same for the other ramp, success again. It's tiny bit out out, but nothing a quick touch up with a file won't fix. I'll also have to look at the points position on the backing plate, it's almost touching the bowl.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The hub on the TX was in pretty poor shape, so I mounted it on the lathe, trued up the flanges, removed the casting bridges between the fins, trued them up then polished the hub and brake backing plate. The rims were badly scored from tyre levers and oxidisation, so I ground the edges of the rims down as much as I could then polished it.. Then I spun up some stainless spacers and aluminium dust cover.
The brake anchor was a danged ugly thing, so I fabbed an ally one from 10mm ally, bending it to clear the tyre. Brake actuating rod wasn't in the best of condition, so I binned that and made a new one from 6mm stainless rod and threaded it both ends. To connect the rod to the brake foot lever I made a funny looking stainless thingy, no idea what they are called, but certainly a lot better than the original piece of rubbish. At the other end of the rod I spun up an adjuster nut and pivot, also from stainless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Front end rebuild. Forks needed a lot of work: Badly corroded and the previous owner must have only had a hammer and chisel in his tool box, the seal area was badly gouged, bits broken off and bent out of round. Not much I could do there, other than clean. Both legs had calliper mounts, but as the bike only has one disk, I ground off the mounts on the left leg, No need for the guard stay tabs as I've shortened the front guard, so I also removed the guard mount tabs then ground the leg smooth and polished both of them up. Whilst I had the innards out, I modified them a little by drilling two holes in each of the damper tubes, supposed to improve fork performance I've read. The stanchions had some deep rust spots up around the lower tree, so I removed the rust and applied some silver paint. As this area can be seen I bought some gaters to cover the area. Bottom tree was painted black, top tree was mirror polished, along with the brake line Junction. Whilst working on the front end I decided to do away with the headlight brackets and made my own from 3mm ally and machined up the risers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The hub was mounted on the lathe and the flanges trued, there was a rather heavy, deep flange between the flanges, so I machined that down a bit so I get get a small mop in there, there polished it. I drilled some go fast holes in the disk, polished the edge, blasted the ally disk mount and fabricated an ally cover to replace the rusted steel cover that covered the left side disk mount holes. The lower tree was painted Black and the brake line distributor polished. I polished the top tree, machined up some risers and polished them also. Front rim was similar to the rear, badly damaged from tyre levers and a few accidents by the look. And finally I machined up some stainless spacers and pressed ally dust cover I also machined onto them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Some painting. Tank had one decent size ding and a few minor ones which I bogged up. Frame was blasted, welds cleaned up as best I could, unfortunately, the Japanese didn't know how to put frames together, nor could they weld when they built these bikes, so the frame is rough as guts. Pegs had the forging marks removed, guards were shortened, rear guad had a few dings which I panel beated and used just a smidgen of bog to smooth it out. Seat pan I put together some time ago. I float coated the final coat over 1200 wet and dry, but I haven't bothered polishing anything yet because I'll probably have to repaint further down the track. Bike already has a number of scratches and dings from resting in the workshop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Exhaust pipes. I mocked up a pipe for the right side, welding together some exhaust pipe at the appropriate angles with the right amount of twist then took it to an exhaust centre and asked them to mandrel bend two bends from 42mm pipe to match the angles, so I could weld them together later. The exhaust guy assured me he could bend the entire pipe with the correct twist, then reverse it for the left side, so naturally I jumped at the chance to avoid welding the two bends together. Roll on five weeks, yep that's right, it took him five weeks, and I picked up the pipes and took them home. Well, what a balls up, the only thing that was correct was the twist. So, I cut both pipes around half way between the two bends, removed a 25 mm section and welded the two bends together. Problem! The bottom bend was way out, leaving the exhaust bending down toward the ground. To fix, I made a V cut in the pipe a few inches after the bend, bent the tail section up and welded the two pieces together. Repeating the process for the other side. Now, if you think exhaust pipe is round, it ain't! So twisting the pipes and butting them together leaves a few steps. So, I hammered them a little so they'd match up, welded them together and ground them smooth, then painted them with exhaust black pint.
I mounted some 10mm thick ally in the four jaw, turned up the 42 mm hole, then marked the position of the 10mm exhaust stud holes drilled them through, shaped the clamps and polished them. For the lower mount, I bent up some 3mm steel plate in a half circle with short returns either side, shaped another 3 mm piece of steel to affix to the frame and welded it to the half circle clamp, then painted it exhaust black paint. Next I bent some 3mm ally plate in a half circle with returns each end, stuck it together with the steel half circle and drilled through four holes for stainless Allen heads, and polished the ally half clamps. The pipes have a very slight upwards sweep.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Remote spin on oil filter and cooler.
To effect the modifications for inclusion of a remote, spin on filter and cooler, I had to modify the right side engine cover. The oil pump is located inside this cover.

The oil galley from the pump is 10mm and is drilled at a odd angle on two axis' to the cover. Halfway along it is cross drilled at a right angle, both of these holes are plugged with a blanking bung at the front of the cover. The cross drilled hole leads to the stock filter behind the cover on the side of the engine side cover. So, the pump pumps oil up the 10mm hole, does a right turn into the cross drilled hole and on to the filter, then on through the engine.

So, in order to fit a remote, spin on filter, I had to remove the bung to the 10mm hole on the front of the cover, drill the 10mm hole out to 10.8mm and thread with a 12mm tap to a depth of 40mm. I then turned up a stainless, threaded barb to suit, the threaded barb when screwed in place, covers the cross drilled hole, thus bypassing the stock filter in the side of the cover. So the pump now pumps oil up the 10mm hole in the cover, through the threaded barb and then on to a remote spin on filter, via a rubber hose.. The oil enters the filter and then exits that and continues on to the cooler. From there it flows to the replacement filter cover I machined up, into the filter housing behind the cover, which is now empty, then on to the engine. Sounds complicated, but it’s not really. The spin on filter does a better job than the stock filter as the stock filter is really only a strainer.

Mounting the side cover on the drill table was a job and a half, as the hole to the oil pump is off skew on two axis’. Once I’d drilled and tapped the 10mm hole, because of the weird angle the hole exits the cover, it’s not square to the surface, so I had to square the surface up and countersink it to accept an O ring to seal the barb using a modified router bit.

Next I spun up a spin on filter housing, drilled two holes in the side and tapped them for mounting, drilled two holes in the top for oil inlet and outlet and underneath turn a round channel for the oil to enter the exit. I then spun up a threaded spigot to screw the filter on, pressed that into place in the filter housing, then spun up a threaded barb that screws into that, sandwiching the filter housing between. To mount the filter housing, I fabricated some new engine mounts from 10mm ally, the right one being extended downward some 25 mm and affixed the filter housing to that. I drilled and tapped two holes in the front of each each mount, fabricated a cooler mount from 3mm all and fixed the cooler to that via four small, Rubber grommets. For mounting I cut four lengths of 10mm ally tube to length to fit between the cooler mounting lugs, cut four stainless 6mm bolts to length, threaded them through the cooler lugs and ally tubes and on through the grommets. To prevent the grommet from being squished from overtightening, I spun up four positive stop T nuts from ally and threaded them.
I removed the old strainer cover and binned it, then machined up a new cover with a protuberance for oil inletand pressed a barb I spun up into that.

So now the the system works thus: Oil leaves the pump and travels up the 10.8mm hole in the side cover and exits via the stainless barb screwed into the front of the cover. The oil enters a rubber tube and travels via the central stainless barb in the filter housing, into the filter then out via the pressed in barb next to the inlet barb. It then travels to the cooler via a rubber hose, through the cooler and cooled oil then flows via a rubber hose to the protuberance on the right side of the engine cover via the pressed in barb and on to lubricate the engine with nice, clean, cooled engine oil.

A big job. Took a lot of thinking and work making fiddly little things, housings, brackets barbs, brackets and so on. There's a bit of a jumble of rubber hoses behind the cooler, but they aren't too noticeable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Seat pan build. I started with a sheet of sheet metal, marked out the shape, bent the rear section up, bent the sides down and bent some more sheet metal around the upturned part to make a cowl, then migged it together. Once on the bike I didn't like it: Cowl was the wrong angle and rear section was too high. So, I cut the cowl off, lowered the bent up section a bit and tried to put the cowl back on, wouldn't fit! As I didn't have any more sheet metal to hand, I cut the cowl in half, bent two sections around for the cowl and spotted them together. This left a gap of around 3-4mm, no matter, I just filled the gap with weld, ground it smooth, then welded the cowl in place. Mounting it was a bit more difficult, front end was easy, I just made up a receiver and bolted it to the frame. For the tongue, I welded a bent spigot to a piece of angle, slid some rubber tube over the spigot, spotted some nuts on the pan and bolted it in place. Rear end was a little different as there was insufficient room between guard and frame to fit a bolt. So I welded a couple of upright tabs to the frame, drilled and tapped them, sunk two grommets in the side of the cowl, turned up a spacer and screwed in two 6mm allen heads with washers. Finally, I cut a section from the front of the seat to avoid the tank tab, bent up some more sheet metal and welded it to the nose of the pan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Side panel build. For the side panels I decided to use ally, as I wanted them in polished ally. First I welded a tab to the rear frame downtube and spun up an ally bullet and bolted it in place, over which the side panel grommet would slide. For the front mounts I welded two B shape brackets to the central downtube and welded two nuts to each. Now the hard part, beating up the side panels. I'd done this before for a Bonneville, but my hands worked back then, nowadays my hands don't work too good due to plastic joints and fused fingers, and crikey it hurts.
I tried using the wife for the hammer work, but that didn't work out, so I resigned myself to to lots of pain and lots of Ibuprofen.
I made up a wooden mould the shape I needed, cut out two ally sheets a little larger and started beating. After getting the edges rolled over at 90degrees, I then had to bend and twist the panels to follow the shape of the frame. Sounds easy, but as the top and bottom rails are set at different angles, believe me, it wasn't. I got the front bend/twist right after much swearing and cursing, now I had to bend twist the rear section to follow the bend on the rear downtube. I finally got that right, then bent up another for the other side.

To fit them to the bike, I sunk three Rubber grommets into each panel and spun up some positive stop T nuts to fit into the the front two grommets. So to fit, you simply slide the the single grommet over the ally bullet bolted to the tab on the rear downtube, then screw two Allen heads, with washers, into the the front B shape brackets. These panels fit real well and looked great, so next came a bit of polishing, even better!

Now after all that work, both side covers were binned. As I had a change of mind on carb intakes and battery box. But, the making of the battery box and two new side panels is another story.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Nope, not sore anymore, the fingers with new joints don't bend a lot, the fused ones don't bend at all, forever dropping things. Prior to the op they were so sore I couldn't bend them at all, I could hardly use them. I had to replace all the door knobs and tap knobs in my house with levers. If I went in a room armed with doorknobs, I had to wait for someone to open the door for me, couldn't even pick my nose. After the op the pain was gone. Psoriatic arthritis, a more severe form of RA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
The batter carrier on the TX was just a lump of rusted metal when I removed it. Tabs everywhere with numerous electrical items attached, that went in the bin real quick. Removing it was a real chore: The rear wheel has to be removed along with the plastic guard and the box pulled out the rear. So, I decided to make one from ally. To mount it I welded a bracket across the frame and sunk two Rubber grommets into it along with a couple of positive stop T nuts I spun up. The box was made of three pieces, one each side pieces and a bent section for the remainder. I then welded the box together, drilled some holes for mounting the starter solenoid underneath and four more on the top returns for mounting. For the front mounts I decided to use the little spigots on the frame and welded up a couple of steel brackets to fit over then. Simple brackets made of 20mm strapping bent at a right angle and welded to a short section of 22mm tube, into which a rubber bushing fits. I also welded some ally strips on the side for mounting the side panels and fabricated a top clamp to secure the battery.

The side panels finish at the front of the battery carrier to allow pods to fit on the carbs. Side panels, being short, didn't require a rolled edge for strength, so they are just flat 1.6 mm thin sheet panels bent at a right angle at the rear to allow fitment of a grommet. At the front two holes were drilled to match up with the battery box brackets, grommets fitted and positive stop T nuts spun up to fit in the grommets. To fit, simply slide the rear grommet over the ally bullet on the rear downtube and two stainless allen heads, with washers, secure the front to the battery box.

The starter solenoid hangs off the bottom of the battery box and the reg/rect is bolted to an aluminium bracket mount to the frame behind the battery box. To join the battery cable, reg/rect positive cable and a cable feeding the two fuses fitted to the reg/rect bracket I spun up a delrin insulator/terminal block. I've since run a fused wire from battery to the terminal block.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
This is a couple of tail lights I built. First one was made of steel which I didn't really like that much, so, I welded up an ally one. I had to make it in two parts so I could get in to polish it. Both came up pretty good, so I can pick and choose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Pushed the starter button this afternoon and the TX roared into life, very loudly with those pipes. So, the single points cam works beautifully. PMA conversion works well as does the dual output coil, cable splitter, remote filter, cooler and ignition wiring. It's running a little lean at the moment due to the pods and exhaust, so I'll have to rejet before syncing. Very happy chappy.
 
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