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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Side panel build. For the side panels I decided to use ally, as I wanted them in polished ally. First I welded a tab to the rear frame downtube and spun up an ally bullet and bolted it in place, over which the side panel grommet would slide. For the front mounts I welded two B shape brackets to the central downtube and welded two nuts to each. Now the hard part, beating up the side panels. I'd done this before for a Bonneville, but my hands worked back then, nowadays my hands don't work too good due to plastic joints and fused fingers, and crikey it hurts.
I tried using the wife for the hammer work, but that didn't work out, so I resigned myself to to lots of pain and lots of Ibuprofen.
I made up a wooden mould the shape I needed, cut out two ally sheets a little larger and started beating. After getting the edges rolled over at 90degrees, I then had to bend and twist the panels to follow the shape of the frame. Sounds easy, but as the top and bottom rails are set at different angles, believe me, it wasn't. I got the front bend/twist right after much swearing and cursing, now I had to bend twist the rear section to follow the bend on the rear downtube. I finally got that right, then bent up another for the other side.

To fit them to the bike, I sunk three Rubber grommets into each panel and spun up some positive stop T nuts to fit into the the front two grommets. So to fit, you simply slide the the single grommet over the ally bullet bolted to the tab on the rear downtube, then screw two Allen heads, with washers, into the the front B shape brackets. These panels fit real well and looked great, so next came a bit of polishing, even better!

Now after all that work, both side covers were binned. As I had a change of mind on carb intakes and battery box. But, the making of the battery box and two new side panels is another story.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Nope, not sore anymore, the fingers with new joints don't bend a lot, the fused ones don't bend at all, forever dropping things. Prior to the op they were so sore I couldn't bend them at all, I could hardly use them. I had to replace all the door knobs and tap knobs in my house with levers. If I went in a room armed with doorknobs, I had to wait for someone to open the door for me, couldn't even pick my nose. After the op the pain was gone. Psoriatic arthritis, a more severe form of RA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
The batter carrier on the TX was just a lump of rusted metal when I removed it. Tabs everywhere with numerous electrical items attached, that went in the bin real quick. Removing it was a real chore: The rear wheel has to be removed along with the plastic guard and the box pulled out the rear. So, I decided to make one from ally. To mount it I welded a bracket across the frame and sunk two Rubber grommets into it along with a couple of positive stop T nuts I spun up. The box was made of three pieces, one each side pieces and a bent section for the remainder. I then welded the box together, drilled some holes for mounting the starter solenoid underneath and four more on the top returns for mounting. For the front mounts I decided to use the little spigots on the frame and welded up a couple of steel brackets to fit over then. Simple brackets made of 20mm strapping bent at a right angle and welded to a short section of 22mm tube, into which a rubber bushing fits. I also welded some ally strips on the side for mounting the side panels and fabricated a top clamp to secure the battery.

The side panels finish at the front of the battery carrier to allow pods to fit on the carbs. Side panels, being short, didn't require a rolled edge for strength, so they are just flat 1.6 mm thin sheet panels bent at a right angle at the rear to allow fitment of a grommet. At the front two holes were drilled to match up with the battery box brackets, grommets fitted and positive stop T nuts spun up to fit in the grommets. To fit, simply slide the rear grommet over the ally bullet on the rear downtube and two stainless allen heads, with washers, secure the front to the battery box.

The starter solenoid hangs off the bottom of the battery box and the reg/rect is bolted to an aluminium bracket mount to the frame behind the battery box. To join the battery cable, reg/rect positive cable and a cable feeding the two fuses fitted to the reg/rect bracket I spun up a delrin insulator/terminal block. I've since run a fused wire from battery to the terminal block.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
This is a couple of tail lights I built. First one was made of steel which I didn't really like that much, so, I welded up an ally one. I had to make it in two parts so I could get in to polish it. Both came up pretty good, so I can pick and choose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Pushed the starter button this afternoon and the TX roared into life, very loudly with those pipes. So, the single points cam works beautifully. PMA conversion works well as does the dual output coil, cable splitter, remote filter, cooler and ignition wiring. It's running a little lean at the moment due to the pods and exhaust, so I'll have to rejet before syncing. Very happy chappy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
With my hands, a long time! Actually, I have no idea as I did it a few times until I achieved the angles and shapes I wanted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
If you've set the float level in your carbs and want to check the actual fuel level , you'll need to access the float bowl. Most bike carbs have a plug on the bottom for emptying the fuel. If you have a spare plug, mount it in your lathe chuck and drill a suitable size hole through it. Don't have a lathe? Too easy mount the plug in the bench drill chuck and a drill underneath in a drill vice, or something similar and drill a hole through the plug. Don't have a bench drill? Too easy, mount the plug in your hand drill and the drill in a vice and drill through. Do not place a drill bit in the drill and drill through the plug, the hole will not go through centrally. If you want an accurate size hole, always use a pilot close to the finish size hole first, yes, even with very small holes. You'll need to either use a centre drill or centre pop the plug first. Then find a barb to plug in the hole, drill the through hole using the same method. For a leak proof join you'll need a barb10mm bigger than the hole. For example a 4.5 mm drill is actually somewhere around 4.34mm and drills a hole around 4.5mm or slightly smaller using pilot first, so you'll need a barb around .10mm bigger. You can turn it down on a lathe, or, turn to size using a drill and file.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Synced the carbs and checked the PMA today. Bike runs beautifully now, idles nicely, revs cleanly, no spitting or hesitation. PMA/reg/rect output is 14.6 volts, so happy with that as well. Timing is spot on on both cylinders, so the single points cam also works well and the filter and cooler deliver a good oil supply with no leaks. Fancy that, all the engine mods worked as planned! This is my homemade manometer I use for syncing, super easy to use, gives a good, stable reading.

Now it's back to cycle parts. I was going to spoke the wheels next, but can't get any stainless spokes for the rear wheel, so I'll have to work on something else: I've been thinking of hunting around for a clagged 650 motor, I'm missing working on motors already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I nutted out a simplified schematic for the TX last night and did a little work on it today. Rather than one harness, I decided on two, one for lights and one for ignition and charging. Five wires for the lights run up the left side of the backbone for lights, another three run up a harness on the right for ignition. I've included some earth cabling in the harness rather than just depending on earthing through the frame.

Once I've routed all the cables to their destinations, I'll zip tie them then wrap the harness removing the zips as I go. Having one harness for ignition and charging circuits and another for lighting simplifies fault faulting and cuts down on the number of colours needed in the harnesses.

I've ordered some stainless spokes, should be here this week. Can only get front spokes at the moment for some reason, seems to be a shortage on rears. As soon as they arrive I'll repolish the hub and rims and spoke it up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Started the TX up again to check the tacho and voltmeter. I had intentions of checking the timing on each cylinder, unfortunately, the POS timing light refused to play. Not to worry, max voltage from the PMA was 14.5 and the bike idles nicely at around 1250 RPM. I placed the camera behind the bike to record the exhaust. Camera doesn't do it justice though, it's very loud and emits a nice burble.
 

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Sounds about as perfect as could be. Hope you don't have to tame it to civility with the evil of a modern muffler.

So, what's with the teaser? Now, I'm more interested in your portable fuel tank than in the bike. How about details on that?
 
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