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Victory or Death
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just to start off, I bought the 1997 CBR600F3 with 23XXX miles on it for a few hundred dollars. It was stored by a bunch of goats, so when I got it, it had goat sh*t all over the place. The bike had been laid down so none of the front fairings were there, and the instrument cluster was poorly welded on, and it had no headlight. The tail section was not attached, and with further examination, the taillight was actually spray foamed into the tail. It also came with some awesome pink pegs, broken clip-on and throttle. So needless to say, it needed some work. The bike was running before I began the tear down. This was my first go at a sport bike, I had previously built and ridden cruisers and bobbers/choppers. I am a fabricator by trade and have done all the work myself. Hope you all like it. I am currently almost complete with the build. I will be updating you on the whole process in the coming days/week, and then the final reveal should be in the next week or two.

Before chopping up began, and after a good cleanse to remove the goat sh*t.



 

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Victory or Death
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
My first order of business was to strip the thing down. took everything off, including the engine, exhaust, controls, etc. I started out by cutting off the sub frame. I love the look of the old school café racers and the look of a street fighter, so I decided to combine the two into the café-fighter style, a little of both worlds. It would have a café style tail section and open frame design, but it would get the body and stripped down look of a street fighter. I used my hand dandy angle grinder and hack saw to get the subframe removed and cleaned up.

I began by mocking up my new subframe and tail section. I used the tried and true method of cardboard mock up. I wanted the curve of the subframe to follow the same or similar ark of the rear tire.



 

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Victory or Death
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Next order of business was to make the cardboard design a reality. I specifically took into account the size steel I would use in the new subframe when I was designing. I got some 1" square tubing, and with a lack of a tubing bender, decided to hand bend all the tubing. the way I accomplished that was by making a jig out of 2X4's, screwed together and then cut in the arc shape I wanted. Not the hardest part was bending it in such a way that the square did not twist.

My initial mock up after getting the main pieces bent;






In order to hold the tank, I put a brace/attachment point across the side bars.

 

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Victory or Death
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
To achieve my the look of my original design, I had to cut out some sheet metal pieces. I once again used some cardboard to first trace and mock a design before I cut it from the steel. I wanted all the intersection to flow, and everything to have a nice curve to it. so I started mocking up the sides of the transitions first.









After that, I had to cut out some one inch strips in order to box everything in. I took more of the same sheet metal and cut the strips, pre bent the pieces and slowly started at one side and tacked the piece down as I went along so that it followed the curve.



 

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Administrator
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very creative fer sure ,why did ya opt fer square tubing?
 

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Victory or Death
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Unfortunately I didn't get any close up pictures of the transition and attachment points once I completed all the welding and grinding smooth, but in the next picture you can see it after I put a little body filler and sanded it smooth.



Now gave away the concept for my tail section in the photo, so I will explain that process. through many a google and youtube searches on making café racer and street fighter tails I settled on making mine out of fiberglass. I watched on video, by Hackaweek on youtube that he took outdoor housing insulation hard pack foam and glues it all together and shapes a gas tank and fender out of it. But after what he said about how the paper backing on the one side was a pain in the butt to get ride of, I decided to go another route. I went to my local Hobby Lobby and got a half dozen blocks of green floral foam. Now, another thing I got out the videos was using the right kind of glue. So I got some contact cement and spray glue that did not have Acetone (eats away the foam rather then glue it). so I glued the blocks into a rough shape of the tail. with the help of my cardboard template and and coping saw, I cut the rough footprint of the tail. once I had that I could begin to cut the profile. after I cut the profile I took it to the bike to cut some channels on the underside for the foam to sit on the rails of the sub frame. when I had the rough block sitting where I wanted it, I began to shape and refine the shape. I was originally going to do a rounded more old styel café tail, but after seeing the tank and front fender I had the idea to continue with the fender theme and put a flat strip down the middle of the tail. below is the completed and sanded shape:





 

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Victory or Death
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
very creative fer sure ,why did ya opt fer square tubing?
I thought about round tubing, just like the old sub, but I wanted it to go more in tune with the rest of the frame and rear swing arm, plus I had the idea of how I wanted the tubing to intersect with the body, and I don't think it would have turned out the same if I used round.
 

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Victory or Death
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Now after I completed my foam shape for the tail, and as you can see on the previous photos I started to lay out the design for the rest of the tail section/seat. I simply used blue painters tape to stretch across the side rails, up onto the tank and transition into the tail.

From there, that is where I failed you all in keeping up with taking pictures :(. it was a messy bit doing all the fiberglass work. But the gist of it is that once I had the seat pan/tail section shape, it was all covered in the blue painters tape and waxed down with simple floor wax. I then followed the steps of fiberglassing: pre cut my sheets of glass, mixed the resign and pre applied to the tail, laid the sheet, and saturated the glass. I did that for two layers of glass sheet, and an additional layer of resign. once it had hardened, and thanks to the wax job, it pulled right off the frame. I now had the rough tail section completed. I then took out the tail section foam form.

The biggest thing I regret not showing in pictures is how I did the tail light and turn signals. I took strip LEDs and laid them on the tail how I wanted them, and marked holes where the wires would go into the tail. then I taped them to the tail section and laid a bunch of body filler around them the encase and build up the tail. Once the filler hardened I shaped and sanded the filler to where the LEDs were flush with the tail body lines. there will be two middle strips as the tail light and two smaller side strips as the turn signals. youll see in the picture below how where they lay in.

What came next was the boring bodywork, I sanded the tail, applied filler, sanded, filler, sanded, primed, wet sand, prime, wet sand, blah blah blah. The picture is of the finished product ready for paint.

 

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Victory or Death
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think that will be my last update for the night. tomorrow I will continue with the updates till I get you all caught up to where the bike sits today (all primed ready for paint). I be filling you in on how the style headlight, the fabricated license plate bracket, shock swap, front end fiasco, the elimination of the old gauge cluster and addition of the danmoto digital gauge cluster, and more if I have time.
 

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Definitely looking forward to following this. I like the look of the subframe and how it flows into the regular frame. Subbed
 

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I'm loving the tail, and the square tubing definitely looks great, but what I'm really in awe of is the fabrication skills. I would do anything to be able to do that stuff.
 

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Victory or Death
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
First off, thanks to all those who have subscribed, viewed or added positive comments, im glad you all like the work thus far. tonight I will try and get a bunch more of the build updated for you all.

And now to continue with the progress......

After completion of the tail section, I figured it would be a good time to do the rest of the body pieces I had there i.e. the tank and front fender. If you all take a look at the picture below I wouldn't say the tank is in that bad of shape, other then the ding on the top which you can see, and then some scratches that were through the paint. Oh not to mention it didn't have a real gas cap, the one that was on it looked like it was from a gas can or something like that, which was package taped onto the tank, which sitting in the Texas heat left a complete mess of sticky residue all over the top and around the gas cap area. So I set out to sand the entire tank, body fill the bad spots, prime, sand, prime, etc. the second picture is of the completed tank all primed and ready for paint.





I wish the story of the front fender was as simple as the tank was. So I told you all in the beginning that the bike was laid down, the fender looked decent, minus a tear in the side. it was a whole other beast once I started sanding it. I ended up pulling probably half a can worth of bondo off the thing. the front and rear end had road rash that had eaten halfway through the fender, the one side had a tear and road rash that had eaten up some of the plastic, and the other sides mounting hole was cracked clean through. now must of you are probably wondering why I didn't just buy a new/used fender. well, I thought of that too, but after some searching I could not find that fender, which I though was odd because I did many google and ebay searches for the exact bike, but they all had different fenders. Well, since I liked the look of the fender, I decided to take on the task of repairing the mess of a fender. Now I wasn't going to go the same route as the previous person filling the thing with bondo and slapping pint over it. So, with some determination and fiberglass, I repaired all the tears, roadrash, and cracks. now of course I still needed to use some body filler to smooth things out, but in turned out pretty good.

Before, look at the mounting point and you'll see one of the tears


After
 

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Victory or Death
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
After the body work was completed on the tin/plastics, I figured I should clean up the frame, forks, swing arm and engine so I can get the thing back together. If you notice in the picture you'll see someone did a shit job of de tabbing and painting the frame, engine, swing arm, and wheels. they di poor prep, to include just painting what they could get to on the frame and engine without disassembling either of them.



Now the engine had certain pieces painted, and the rest was left alone. the frame had the original frame color on the inner side of the frame and a shitty black paint job on the outer side. the wheels, originally white, were painted black, but the swing arm and rear wheel had so much grease and chain lube built up all over them I didn't know what was paint and what was dirty.

So the first order of business was to clean and degrease all that stuff. I took degreaser and a scotch pad to all of that to remove dirt and roughen the surface for priming. The swing arm and frame got de-tabbed. I removed all the useless pins, tabs, weld remnants and gust generally smoothed things out. on the rear swing arm I removed all the tabs for the chain guard and other tabs I knew wouldn't be used. So after it was all cleaned up, I shot a couple coats of primer, with sanding between, and a final wet sand for smoothness. For the frame, swinger, and front fork bodies I went with the semi-gloss black roll bar and chassis paint. It is durable, self priming and supposed to prevent rust. So I laid 2-3 coats on all those parts for extra protection.

For the engine, I originally thought about just doing a blacked out engine, but I thought about the overall color scheme and what I could do to bring some color in. So I started out by cleaning the engine, which once I took it apart I found more goat shit sitting on the case.


So it was dirty, had paint flacking and just needed a little TLC. So after about 3-4 hours with degreaser and a toothbrush and scotch bright I cleaned the entire engine. So back to the color scheme, I still wanted the majority of the engine to still be black, so I got the VHT high heat engine enamel in black, and after some debate and looking at some other bikes from here, I bough the VHT Red engine enamel. I did the main case black but did the clutch, alternator, water pump, and head in red. I thought it was enough to add some pop, without having an entire black or red engine.

Shiny new paint





And, as you can also see in the pictures, to break up the black I did the motor mounts/hangers in the same read as well.
 

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Victory or Death
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Now, I had many internal debate on the wheels and what color I should do them, do I go black and have them blend in, go red and have them stick out, or go some other color completely. So on a trip to the hardware store to pick up some primer I saw a can of rustoleum that really caught my eye. if you look up Rustoleum Metallic Aged Bronze, youll see the color my wheel are now. Its a really cool color, it has some metallic sparkle to it, and the aged bronze color is amazing in the sunlight, yet it is very subtle and looks black when its not in the sunlight. I think its pretty cool.

I have a picture of the wheels in the dark, but need to get a pick of them in the sunlight to get the whole affect.

Before cleaning and paint (was poorly painted black with the previous white showing through)

After (ill get some daytime picks tomorrow and post them)


* of note, after I applied the paint on the wheels I followed them up with 2-3 coats of clear wheel enamel that is supposed to help with rock chips, well see how it holds up.

And now by the last picture you can see the direction I went with the brakes as well. those were in need of a good cleaning as well. I tore down the brakes and cleaned them and put new brake pads in all three of them, changed fluids etc. I kept all the accessory brackets for the brakes black, didn't want to go overboard on the red. the before and then after are below:

Before:



After:
 

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Sick of being frozen
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Looks like a CBR F1 front end, that would be why the wheels don't match and the fender is different.
 
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