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Discussion Starter #1
Finally after a year and a half the new update of my 2009 Buell XB12Scg is done and it is time to share the information about the project.

So, I had stock 2009 Buell XB12Scg and then I did some mods for it about 5 years ago. You can read about this project here https://www.customfighters.com/forums/showthread.php?t=105730

A fey years ago I decided to take it to the next level.

During this time I collected a lot of data and it is not going to be easy and fast to dump all that stuff right here. So I'm planning to share it piece by piece from the very beginning when I will have time. I will probably skip some dead routes and dead options I considered and tested during the build and represent only the path led to the final result. I will also just briefly mention about the mods I performed in my previous build and will focus on the new mods in this thread.


Here is the current mods list:

-Modified side bar mirrors CRG
-Side bar turn signals Rizoma Sguardo
-Clip-on handlebar and top tree clamp from Buell Firebolt
-Buell Firebolt clutch cable, throttle cables and front brake line
-Buell XB comfort kit right side airscoop
-K&N oil filter
-Knight Design foot levers
-Scorpio alarm system
-Welded up to 240 mm rear wheel
-Chain conversion
-Motogadget Motoscope mini and custom Motosigh Mini cluster
-LSL Urban Headlight
-Highway foot pegs
-Custom subframe with solo seat with LED strip integrated turn signals
-Integrated fuel pressure gauge
-Integrated voltmeter
-Harley Davidson Voltage Regulator
-Steering damper
-Front disk brake air scoop
-Airbox relocated electric components with with custom wires harness
-Carbon fiber airbox cover
-Black powder coated rims
-Breather reroute with Catch Can V2.0
-Side mounted horn signal
-Rear brake fluid canister sock
-All Ball heavy duty starter overrunning clutch
-Barnett clutch plates
-Tires white lettering stickers
-T-Rex wheels axles sliders
-Intake manifold custom flanges
-Mirrors holes plugs


First thing fists, here is the walk around video:

https://youtu.be/c89DHH0DOSU


And here are the pictures of the final result:




































































 

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Discussion Starter #3
And I want to start from the beginning. I always like how Buell XB looks. But I like even more how Buell XB looks with mods.

Browsing through the interned I saw a bunch of cool looking Buells but I can name only a few of them which look the best in my opinion. So I use those best looking Buells for inspiration.



The first credit goes to Fredy ee http://www.fredy.ee/03-buell-xb9s-lightning-240-4/

You also can see a bunch of another cool custom motorcycles he built here http://www.fredy.ee




The second credit goes to this Buell from Simone Conti https://bikebrewers.com/buell-xb12-scm-r/

You also can check his Facebook page with another cool builds https://www.facebook.com/Simone-Conti-motorcycles-SCM-490905224362745/timeline/





The third credit goes to this Buell and this guy https://www.texmotorbike.com/start.html

 

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Fuck me! Nice build. Love those Buells. One question: where'd you have to ride to so you get pictures with sunshine in them?
 
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Discussion Starter #6
The first thing I want to mention quickly is the mods I already built prior this update and I decided to keep.

240 mm rear wheel welding up and chain conversion. You can find details here https://www.customfighters.com/forums/showthread.php?t=105730



Retractable highway footpegs. Details and building process are on this page https://www.customfighters.com/forums/showthread.php?t=105730&page=4



Front brake cooling air scoop. Details are on this page https://www.customfighters.com/forums/showthread.php?t=105730&page=7




Breather reroute catch can. The details are here https://www.customfighters.com/forums/showthread.php?t=105730&page=8




Steering damper. Details are on this page https://www.customfighters.com/forums/showthread.php?t=105730&page=8



Integrated micro voltmeter. Building process details are here https://www.buellxb.com/forum/showthread.php?52809-Micro-voltmeter-in-handlebar-control-housing





Harley Davidson Voltage Regulator and voltage regulator bracket. Building process details are here https://www.buellxb.com/forum/showt...idson-Sportster-Voltage-Regulator-on-Buell-XB





Intake manifold high performance custom flanges. About design and build process you can read here https://www.buellxb.com/forum/showt...ntake-manifold-flanges-for-2008-2010-Buell-XB




I also kept some aftermarket parts from previous build like right side air scoop, exhaust header shield, Knight Design foot levers, All Ball starter overrunning clutch upgrade, Barnett clutch plates and T-Rex wheels axles sliders.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The first stage is drawing some sketches. I like the Freedy's Buell and I decided to take it is as reference for my sketches.

I was planning to use SolidWorks for 3D design and Microsoft Paint for quick sketches. So I went to GrabCad web side first and tried to find as much Buell 3D files as possible. But the only useful thing I found is the Buell XB engine model. So credit for the engine 3D model goes to this guy https://grabcad.com/library/buell-xb9r-03-engine-1 . This is pretty close reverse engineered model of the Buell XB engine external geometry and it perfectly useful for me.


So nothing else useful I was able to found. Fortunately I already had CAD model of Buell XB fuel tank. And this tank model is not reverse engendered CAD model, it is native CAD model designed by Buell and somehow leaked from them! I found this model on GrabCad web site many years ago and downloaded it but now I can not find it there for some reason anymore. Probably somebody reported about it to Harley and they deleted the model from the GrabCAD web site.

So here is the reference geometry I found in the Internet:








But I still needed whole motorcycle 3D model for the project. I had some components 3D CAD models from my previous projects like 240 mm rear wheel, front brake air scoop and so on so it helped a little. The rest of the parts should be reverse engineered.

I started scanning whole motorcycle and build CAD model of the components. I used Next Engine 3D Scanner, pretty slow, not super accurate and difficult to use 3D scanner, but this is the only thing I had access to.

The 3D scanning preparation process includes putting reference points on the part (they need especially if part large, smooth and has no noticeable features for reference). it is necessary for scanning the object from different angles and putting scanned areas together aligning them using the reference points.

I used plasticine for reference points







Then I covered glossy or dark parts with Developer Spray so the 3D scanner can see the object





And then I scanned all external parts of the motorcycle:












After 3D scanning you have cloud of points in 3D space like this






But these clouds of points are useless for CAD design. I had to use these 3D meshes as reference and build CAD models of the parts with mathematically determined faces (3D CAD models) in SolidWorks. This works takes enormous amount of time, especially for parts required surface modeling like LSL Headlight, airscoops, airbox cover and so on.
















Parallel to this reverse engineering work I started sketching options for the motorcycle appearance. I used SolidWorks screenshots of the 3D models overlapped above the motorcycle pictures and Microsoft Paint program for sketching.













 

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Daaaaayyyymmmm that's a mean looking bike!!! Storing this for future reading with proper thought
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks!

I was happy with airbox cover shape and the idea was to keep the stock airbox cover (I bought aftermarket carbon fiber airbox cover with air ducts after all) and design new tail. This is how basically Fredy ee Buell top monocoque portion was made and it looks fantastic.

Once I had figured out best side view profile for the tail section on preliminary Paint sketches I started surface modeling in Solid Works. The picture below shows the CAD design mess I developed in process of sculpting the tail shape.





One of the main reason of designing in CAD program is you can play with different shapes and forms without mocking this up on real motorcycle, you can check fitments of the internal components and so on.

But for me on this stage the most important part was to design the tail shape which will look good and match the motorcycle appearance from different points of view and from different perspectives. I saw many motorcycles with nice looking shape from one angle, but once you start walking around it you figure out that it does not look so pleasant from another angle. And again the good thing about CAD design you can see how your shape looks from different perspectives. If you don't like it you can tweak it until you will be happy wit result. Fortunately there are 3D Printing technologies and materials which allow you to print almost any shape with crazy mechanical features with no limitations, strong and heat resistant, with nice surface finish, with no post processing required and I decided that the easiest and the most reasonable way to build the tail using such 3D printing technology, HP Multi Jet Fusion 3D printer particularly with Nylon12 material impregnated with black pigment for black color. So I was not limited in tail shape and features and I designed it the way it looks the best because of there was not any difficulty in producing any shape with any mechanical features.














I developed the tail shape also considering there will be some components hidden inside like rear shock absorber remote gas reservoir, alarm system components, tail lights wiring, tail lock and support frame of course. It also should accommodate seat foam padding glued on top, licence plate bracket with licence plate light on bottom and tail LED stripe tail light combined with turn signals.

After all woes with tail internal components allocation process I came up with pretty dense and slim packing of everything inside of this thin tail.







The tail slides on and off the CNC machined subframe. The subframe cares Scorpio alarm system electronics, rear shock absorber gas can and wire harness for the tail. It also has key lock from original Buell XB seat I implemented in the new tail so you can slide it on and lock it.







As you can see the tail slides off the subframe with tail light, license plate light and licence plate itself. And you may ask, how do you connect this lights in the separate tail to the motorcycle harness without wires? Well, I found the solution - I mounded spring loaded pogo-pins in the tail and they engage with the electrical contact padding on the subframe making complete circuit to control the tail lights.





So 4 pins provides:

-Ground wire
-Run light, Brake light and licence plate light "+" wire
-Left turn signal "+" wire
-Right turn signal "+" wire

Run light, Brake light and licence plate light "+" wire provides low and high voltage to maintain Run and Stop LED light on the same LEDs array. And the same wire feeds the license plate light. The reason I use 4 wires instead of 5 wires is because of I have so limited space in the tail that I can not mount one more pin and route one more wire in the tail.


And you may say, hey, your licence plate light will flicker and change brightness with stop signal light once you will press the brake. NO, it will not! Because of my tail light has custom build PCB controller board to maintain constant voltage on the licences plate LEDs array regardless of it gains run signal voltage or stop signal voltage. A friend of mine is electrical engineer and he designed this custom PCB controller board with LEDs array exclusively for this project, so this awesome feature would not be possible without him. I will share the details about it later.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The next step was pretty challenging. I had to find place and accommodate the rest of the electrical system components: battery, fuses, relays, flasher, tilt sensor and ECM unit.

I already assumed the place for this stuff is gong to by space in the airbox. So to figure out how I can place all this stuff inside the airbox I had to reverse engineer the arbox parts and all the electrical components nd create CAD models for them. My plan was to minimize modifications of the airbox and build a frame which will hold all the electrical components so I can easily move all the components from the airbox just removing the frame in case if I will need to get under the airbox.

So here is real part vs 3D scanned object vs reverse engendered CAD model



And here is what the airbox on motorcycle




After this work had been done I had to figure out what is the maximum battery size I will be able to squeeze inside this space, and most impotently if this battery is capable to crank big V-Twin engine.

So I bought and tested two batteries - Antigravity AG-SC-1 4 cells lithium battery and Antigravity AG-801 8 cells lithium battery. It seems like Antigravity makes the smallest motorcycle battery on the market, so I did not have much choice. They do not install battery management boards on 4 cells and 8 cells batteries though, so it is more dangerous stuff and requires more attention.

After some riding tests I found that both batteries are capable to crank the engine but 4 cells battery makes it really slow and it really struggles. 8 cells battery cranks engine much better but even for 8 cells battery cranking this engine is tough task. You can see on the video in my 1st post how it struggles with compression bump. But anyway, there is no space in the airbox for something bigger, and I was not pleased with 4 cells battery so my choice was the Antigravity AG-801 8 cells lithium battery https://www.amazon.com/Antigravity-...ies+AG-801&qid=1579246978&s=automotive&sr=1-1

I also had to figure out how to mount power management components: fuses, relays and flasher. the stockk Buell fuse box is pretty big and would not fit the airbox. I needed really compact solution. After some searching in Internet I found it. Littlefuse company makes nice compact, dense packed configurable fuses and relay modules for MINI fuses and MICRO relays for automotive industry. You can assemble the power management block with the shape you want like a Lego. They have catalog with different blocks, different crimping terminals for different wire gauges and another necessary parts to configure and assemble power block you want. https://www.littelfuse.com/products...ies/powr-blok-modular-power-distribution.aspx

After figuring out how many fuses and relays I need I found necessary Littlefuse parts and parts numbers in their catalog and bought it online on DigiKey and Mouser.

To make long story short here is the final layout of the airbox power management components.







As you can see all the components are mounted on the chassis so you can easily move them out the way if you will need to. This chassis is going to be assembled from plastic parts printed on FDM 3D printer from ABS plastic. ABS is pretty heat resistant plastic and can stay in that area without warping or melting under heat from the engine.




Here is the power block assembled from small LittleFuse blocks with fuses, relays and flasher. Those small square blocks can be differently oriented and attached to each other to maintain the shape and components allocation you want.




My power management block has a few extra fuses and relays in addition to the existing Buell XB fuses and relays. Those extra fuses and relays are for alarm system, Motogadget Motoscope and Motosign cluster and power outlets. There are some LEDs lights in the Motogadget Motosign cluster dedicated for Low Fuell Light, Check Engine Light and Neutral Gear Light. Those lights in Motogadget Motosign gauge can not be connected to the Buell XB electric system directly to the signal wires, the LEDs need to be connected to the relays and relays are controlled by those signals wires. You can find more technical details about how the Motoscope Motosign LEDs lights connected to the motorcycle electrical system through the relays here https://www.buellxb.com/forum/showt...pe-Mini-M-Lock&p=532346&viewfull=1#post532346

I also eliminated Auxiliary relay from the motorcycle harness because of I do not use this relay and there is no space for this relay anyway. But on Buell XB this Auxiliary relay is controlled by ECM and if you will remove it the ECM will lit Check Engine Light with error. To eliminate this error you have to change EPPROM file on ECM. Here are more details about how to disable Auxiliary relay on Buell XB to prevent ECM error message http://www.badweatherbikers.com/buell/messages/3842/859112.html?1578804915
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks!

Then I had to figure out where and how to mount Motoscope Mini instrument cluster and fuel pressure gauge display. The reason I decided to install fuel pressure gauge is because of the motorcycle had issues with air and fuel delivery or something. The engine heated too fast, average fuel value was too far from default, idle air control mechanism was not enough to keep idle RPM withing necessary limits. I'm not sure what exactly the issue was, but after I rebuilt fuel pump, cleaned and resealed throttle body, cleaned injectors, put stock air filter the problem disappeared. After this I decided to install fuel pressure gauge to make sure the fuel pump is not the issue if the problem will came back because of rebuilding fuel pump and even just checking fuel pressure by conventional method is not fun at all and PITA and I don't want to guess what is wrong. So installing fuel pressure gauge eliminated a lot of hassle and frustration for the future.

There were two options in my mind about how to mount the gauges. First option was to design and machine custom triple tree top bracket with pockets for the gauges. But that was pretty expensive so I was looking for alternative ways so I can save some money. Then I figured out the second option and it was to mount the displays to existing stock Buell Firebolt Top Tree Bracket. After some 3D modelling in SolidWorks the second option looked pretty accurate and I decided to go this way.




Motoscope Mini https://motogadget.com/shop/en/motoscope-mini.html is pretty popular micro gauge. Motogadged and another companies make special brackets for Motoscope Mini with integrated LEDs for displaying signals (neutral gear, turn signals, check engine light, low fuel, oil pressure sensor, etc). They call it Combi Frames https://motogadget.com/shop/en/motoscope-mini.html?tab=brackets and Motosign https://motogadget.com/shop/en/motosign-mini.html

But I was not able to find something will work for me out of the box so I had to design and build my own "Motosign". So here it is



This is basically custom aluminum bracket for Motoscope with LEDs mounted on prototyping board and potted with epoxy compound - the same way as original Motosign made. The LEDs have integrated resistor so no additional resistors required, they are just soldered directly to the cable wires. Original Motogadged Motosigh cable you can buy online separately and use it for you custom Motosign.

This is the fuel pressure gauge I installed https://www.dynotunenitrous.com/store/scripts/prodView.asp?idproduct=130 Dyno Tune fuel pressure gauge goes with display and fuel pressure sensor. I designed small bracket for the display. I planned to attach the display with double sided adhesive tape to the bracket.

 

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In order to install the fuel pressure gauge I had to attach the fuel pressure sensor to the fuel rail. So I drilled and tapped a 1/8-27 NPT hole in the rail





Cleaned everything in water jet sink and attached the sensor with some Teflon tape







Assembled the intake manifold and put it back on the engine



 

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I totally forgot to mention about the horn. Originally horn on Buell XB is allocated in the headlight assembly. But with the new headlight there is no space in that area for horn anymore. In previous build the horn was allocated in the airbox https://www.customfighters.com/forums/showpost.php?p=2096617&postcount=19 but there was no space for it in the airbox anymore too.

So I found another a spot for the horn. I planned to allocate it behind the oil radiator on custom bracket on highway footpeg structure and cover it with 3D printed shroud to maintain finished look and to protect from dirt and water splashes






I also had to find a spot for the rear brake fluid reservoir. Originally it was mounted on the seat subframe. But with the new seat I had to find another spot for it. I planned to mount the rear brake fluid reservoir to the existing frame mounting spot and designed adapter for this mount.



 

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When the necessary parts CAD models were done it was time to start building the parts.

I started from airbox and 3D printed the airbox power management chassis components on FDM 3D printer. I used Raise 3D Pro 2 Plus 3D printer. It has big enough tray size to print the biggest chassis part as one piece without splitting. The part material for the airbox chassis is ABS filament. ABS is enough heat resistant to withstand heat from the engine in the airbox without warping or melting.













I went through a few iterations and tweaks before the chassis perfectly fitted the airbox.
















Then I had to modify the airbox parts.

I cut opening in the airbox shells for the wire harness. I laser cut masking tape wit opening profile to mark the opening perimeter for cutting. Then with drills and files finished the job.

























There was also a little interference between the airbox an the relay corner I was not able to eliminate because of there was no space in the airbox to move the relay somewhere else. So I marked and cut a hole in this place.













The fuse block cover should be held down with small magnets. I glues a few small magnets with superglue. I used wax cooking paper to level magnets properly with another magnets during curing the glue.




 

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Next step was to prototype the parts and check fitment. The reason for this step is to eliminate possible expensive adjustments in the future if the expensive metal parts will not fit properly.

I used FDM 3D printer and PLA plastic filament for prototyping.

Here are cluster for Motoscope Mini and bracket for fuel pressure gauge











Before prototyping the seat I designed and built 3D template to check the airbox cover geometry and performed necessary adjustments in the CAD model to match the actual geometry perfectly. The seat is pretty big part and 3D printing prototype for this part would take a lot of time so this was the fast way to speed up geometry perfecting process before final check.

I laser cut acrylic sheets and glued this 3D template








Once I verified the profile of the airbox to seat interface it was time to prototype the seat itself.

Because of the seat is pretty big part I split the seat for a few pieces and printed them in parallel on different 3D printers to speed up the process











Then I glued the piece together








Also 3D printed the frame elements to check fitment




Then painted the seat prototype with black spray paint to match the final color




Laser cut the foam pads and glued on the seat prototype













And the final step prion building the real metal parts is to check the parts prototypes fitment on the motorcycle







 

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Some next level shit happening right here... Can only gaze in awe
 

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After all necessary adjustments have been done I started preparing for ordering the parts. I used http://rpgroupltd.com service to produce the parts. They are Chinese prototyping company and they do decent quality work, they do it fast and not expensive. Of course you have to prepare for them CAD models and all necessary drawings with specifications, like materials, tolerances, tapped holes, finishes, treatment and so on if you want to make this process smooth with minimum troubles.

So I created drawings for each parts with such specifications.













After a couple weeks I had the parts in my hands. The two shiny parts are brackets of the seat frame and they should be mounted to the top portion of the rear shock absorber. Since this area has not to much space to put material on the brackets material should be pretty strong. I decided to use aerospace grade 17-7PH Stainless Steel in Condition A for these brackets. This material is strong as carbon steel even in Condition A and corrosion resistant at the same time. The rest of the parts are 6061-T6 aluminum, sandblasted and black anodized.




I assumed the seat body should be 3D printed on HP Multi Jet Fusion 3D Printer out of Nylon 12 PA Black. I contacted a bunch of prototyping companies who has such 3D printer and most of them did not accept this work because of they thought the part is too big to print it as one solid piece on this 3D printer without issues even the part fits the tray. Finally I found a company who accepted this work. Stratasys Direct Manufacturing https://www.stratasysdirect.com printed the seat for me and it turned out great with black sand blasted finish. The cool thing about this 3D printer is it has very good resolution and after cleaning and sandblasting the part is looks like factory made product. Also the strength of the parts is the same, as if it would be solid injection molded nylon. The part is fused with black pigment all way through so even if you put deep scratch on the part the scratch will have same color as the part. This material is also pretty heat resistant so it should withstand the heat from the engine. It is also UV light resistant and moisture resistant too.














Prototype vs final product







Then I 3D printed trays out of ABS plastic filament on FDM 3D printer for alarm system components (the parts in red circles). The reason to make the trays out of plastic it to provide radio wave transparency for 2 way alarm system antenna.







 
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