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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Very neat solution to hiding the header tank, tig welder would probably be a better solution for an ally tank, assuming that there's any reason to swap the printed tank? Most bikes and cars use plastic header tanks now anyway...
Tig is probably the way to go for the aluminum tank, but I dont have a tig welder. This aluminum solder looked interesting and worth a shot. I'll see how well the nylon tank holds up long term.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Just a few more details left, then I might talk a bit about some ideas for changes/additions.

To finish the coolant hoses, I covered them with some stainless tube braid and econo fit clamps from Earl's.

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The clamps required a lot of modification to fit on the engine and allow for the bends in some of the hoses:

Automotive lighting Automotive tire Gas Auto part Machine

Automotive tire Automotive lighting Rim Gas Nickel


One problem with these clamps is that they move the actual clamp band farther away from the base of the coolant tube. So, I get nervous about them popping off.
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And then one did pop off. The left side radiator tube jumped off during a ride.
Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Tire Tread


For the rear brake master cylinder I used clear and black vinyl heat shrink tube and I think I will update the coolant hoses to this as well:

Tire Wheel Automotive lighting Bicycle tire Crankset

The heat shrink tube is kinda sticky, so I found it easier to straighten out the hose with a dowel or long screwdriver, then pull the heat shrink over it.
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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
When I was considering the 2014 vfr800 radiator setup, I found I could mount the oil cooler in the stock location with the stock bracket stacked on top of the 2014 radiator bracket.

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All the fins are visible from the front for fresh air, not blocked by the radiator:

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When I switched to using the vfr750 radiator I had to come up with something else. The space behind the front exhaust tubes was free and had some good mounting points. I thought since it was close to the hot exhaust it might be a good idea to use a larger oil cooler. Ebay had an RC51 oil cooler available, so I bought that. It has a few extra cross tubes and fins.

I didn't do a good job photographing the bracketry build but here is the finished product. It uses a stainless rod held in place with shaft collars, and a bent metal bracket which is also held in place with collars.
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To connect the cooler to the engine I cut up the stock fittings and soldered on some AN fittings. Then connected them with stainless braided hose.
Here are the rear oil fittings:

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Then the front oil fittings:
I cut the stock oil line tubing at an angle to align it with the incoming oil hose.
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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
I was experimenting here with a lower bracket for the oil cooler, but it was not necessary. The oil hoses are stiff enough to keep the cooler from rotating around the top support,

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And some paint:
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And I think that's it for the build as is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Some updates I'm working on now: Covers for the radiator, and new front assembly that will use much less brackets and may attach to the frame instead of the forks.
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The coolant tank will be the main structure and support the headlights, tip-over sensor and gauges. Nose bodywork is still being worked out.

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When I was considering the 2014 vfr800 radiator setup, I found I could mount the oil cooler in the stock location with the stock bracket stacked on top of the 2014 radiator bracket.

View attachment 154496
View attachment 154497

All the fins are visible from the front for fresh air, not blocked by the radiator:

View attachment 154498

When I switched to using the vfr750 radiator I had to come up with something else. The space behind the front exhaust tubes was free and had some good mounting points. I thought since it was close to the hot exhaust it might be a good idea to use a larger oil cooler. Ebay had an RC51 oil cooler available, so I bought that. It has a few extra cross tubes and fins.

I didn't do a good job photographing the bracketry build but here is the finished product. It uses a stainless rod held in place with shaft collars, and a bent metal bracket which is also held in place with collars.
View attachment 154499


To connect the cooler to the engine I cut up the stock fittings and soldered on some AN fittings. Then connected them with stainless braided hose.
Here are the rear oil fittings:

View attachment 154500
View attachment 154501

View attachment 154502
View attachment 154503
Then the front oil fittings:
I cut the stock oil line tubing at an angle to align it with the incoming oil hose.
View attachment 154504 View attachment 154505
I remember the stock rad on the 750's was fairly big and the 800 originally two rads... how are you keeping the engine temp under control?
My 750 used to kick out a shit load of heat if I got stuck in traffic on a got day...
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
I remember the stock rad on the 750's was fairly big and the 800 originally two rads... how are you keeping the engine temp under control?
My 750 used to kick out a shit load of heat if I got stuck in traffic on a got day...
At the moment I am keeping the engine temps in control by crossing my fingers and hoping for the best. But I think my riding style and location here in the northwest USA should let me get away with it. I have got the temp up to 220 in stop and go traffic, but the fans come on and keep it from getting higher.

If heat ends up being a problem, I could try switching to the 2014 radiator option. I would need new front exhaust headers and relocate the oil cooler, but I would get more radiator and fan area.
 
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