Custom Fighters - Custom Streetfighter Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Build It Ride It Live It
Joined
·
10,684 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This thread is dedicated to the many questions posted regarding how to swap a tail section from one model to another. This isn't exactly a step by step guide. It's more of a general idea as every bike will be different. Hopefuly you'll have a better idea as to what is involved.

The Project bike is ATLStreetfighters 2003 Bandit 1200. The new tail is from a 2005 ZX10R.

Tools required are as follows...

Basic metric socket and wrench set.
Metric Allen wrenches.
Screwdrivers.
tape measure.
Hacksaw,
Sawzall,
4" Grinder,
Dremel with cut off wheels, sanding drums and a number of assorted bits.
Hand Drill.
Welder.

NOTE: There are some special skills required in this swap. Welding is one of them. I don't claim to be an expert welder, but a general knowledge of how to is a must. If you can't weld, find someone that can. There are a few parts in this swap that are structural.

This is our starting point. He's got some mods done but the tail section and seat are factory.




First order of business is getting the rear end striped. Bodywork, undertray, elctrics, everything needs to be removed. Be sure to hang electrics out of the way so as to not get hit with saws or grinders. Also, remove the battery and CDI or ECM from the bike. Since we will be welding on the bike, we don't want the amps from the welder or hot slag or sparks effecting the electrics and potentionly frying something.




Now it's time for our first test fit. At this point, we just want to see what's in the way. What brackets need to be removed, etc.



The first cuts were to remove 2 of the original body mount/seat mount points so we could slide the tail up to the point we wanted.




Test fitting the stock seat for reference.



In this case, we opted to reuse the seat latch. Actually, we will be adding a second keyed latch. 1 for the front, 1 for the rear. At this stage the seat latch bracket was removed as it needs to be repositioned to meet the passenger seat from the ZX10.



We've also ground away a couple tabs from the bottom of the frame to clean things up, and ground the remainder of the factory welds smooth.




At this point we are skipping ahead. All the factory brackets have been cut loose and we are starting to tack them back into place were we need them. Be careful as you cut. Try and keep as much usable material as possible as we are trying to reuse as much of the factory bits as possible. The rear tube was actually a grabrail we cut off the left side of the subframe. This acts as our retaining brace for the passenger seat.



Test fit the passenger seat. You may have noticed in the last pic that the cable was not connected, but the actuator for the latch was still easy to access by hand. It will be swap around under the bracket later for security. Just be aware of it for now, cause it's a pain to unlatch otherwise.




Test fit the tail with the seat to be sure you're all lined up.



Finish weld your brackets and test fit your parts again.



Next brackets added is the mounts for the bodywork. As I stated earlier, being able to reuse as many of the original brackets is benificial. Here, two of the original threaded body mounts were cut loose and rewelded pointing up to match the mounting holes in the ZX10 tail. 2 more tabs were cut loose from the same bracket and welded to the back and drilled for the rear mounts.

We have also added the front seat latch bracket. This was the original grab handle bracket from the rear of the bike. It was fliped, material taken away and bent and beat into place for a tight fit befor being welded in place.



Brackets welded, seat latches in place and hooked up.




The original battery box was cut in half and fited with the under tail of the ZX10. This was pretty simple. Measure from the front mounting mount of the undertray to the edge of the under tail and wack it away.




Lastley, it's all taken apart again, weldes are ground down, flash rust sanded away and the factory paint is given a scuff with 600 grit and steel wool befor the frame is taped off and painted.



A couple coats of Gloss Black rattle can latter...



After the paint has dried it can all go back together.


 

·
Build It Ride It Live It
Joined
·
10,684 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
In this section I'll go into cutting down a 1 piece seat into a solo. The original bandit seat was reused. Like the undertray, it was cut in half and shaved down to match the new tail. I didn't want the chore of having to recover the entire seat. And since we didn't have to mess with the front half too much only half the cover was pulled back.

Pull the staples from the upolstery and remove the cover. Test fit the seat and see where your cut needs to be. Draw a cut line across the foam. Remove the seat latch from the bottom of the seat and pull the studs from the pan. These parts will be reused latter.




With a Sanding drum in the Dremel very lightly sculpt the foam. The presure of the tools weight alone is enough. If you push in you'll dig chunks out of it, which you don't want. This is a slow process and you'll look like the abomidable snowman befor your finished. I don't recomend this step being done in your living room ;)



Trim and smooth out the bottom of the pan as well. This hangs over the new plastic a bit so getting this area cut down and clear is important so the latch works smoothly.



Once you get everything sculpted and smoothed out, pull the upolstery back, stretch and trim to fit and staple back to the pan.

Last thing to do is snap it back to the bike...

 

·
Build It Ride It Live It
Joined
·
10,684 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
One other little mod that we did to Rep CF proper.

There were some large holes in the ZX10 tail for a tag mount. Obviously we didn't want those. Eddie came up with a kool idea to fill them in...

Little chop, some Lexan sheet, Black paint and a CF sticker later...



Add some LED's and you get...



That turns on when you hit the brakes.

Some cool random pics of the bike with the happy customer :D




About to get a swift kick in the ass, LOL



We out...

 

·
Ridin' Dirty
Joined
·
6,773 Posts
Repped,

that's a great example, with this large influx of new people lately, this should def help people out. I was noticing lots of questions about tail swaps also.


Clean example though, that tail looks great on the bandit. :rock:
 

·
FAT IS THE NEW SKINNY!!!!
Joined
·
3,036 Posts
Tail came out great on there. Wasnt sure how it was gonna look when he bought it but Im diggin it.
 

·
Konichiwa Bitches
Joined
·
17,772 Posts
Maybe....lol! ;)

Yeah, we finished up a couple things I had been wanting to do to mine for a while. Diggin the ZX tail on the Bandit-it really does look good. :D
 

·
fighter transplant in NC
Joined
·
14,319 Posts
I'll give you permission to use my front end swap 101 thread for the streetfighters for dummies book
 

·
Bikes, Bitches and Beer
Joined
·
973 Posts
lol, those arnt the smoothest weld beads iv seen, but they do the trick! Thanks for the post
 

·
Rash Master
Joined
·
76 Posts
Good job and thanks for the thought and time to put it togeather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I'm looking to do a tail swap. Is it easier to just use the subframe from you bike and mod it to to fit what ever tail you use or would it be easier to get the subframe for whatever tail I get and mod the subframe to fit?
 

·
Just Here For The Party
Joined
·
696 Posts
I'm looking to do a tail swap. Is it easier to just use the subframe from you bike and mod it to to fit what ever tail you use or would it be easier to get the subframe for whatever tail I get and mod the subframe to fit?
Depends on your skillset and the answer to this question: Can you weld?

No:

It's easier and safer to use your bikes' subframe and mod the tail to fit. Fiberglass is cheaper to start out with than welding (you don't need to buy a welder for example), and if you screw up fairings they just look ugly. As opposed to your subframe failing while you're riding.


Yes:

Mod the subframe. Unless you're patient and meticulous, the chopped and glassed tail section never looks or never fits quite right. Cutting and welding on a few new mounting points is an afternoon of work, a quick spray of paint and off you go riding.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top