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Hi guys,
Never done any massive work on bikes, so excuse any stupid questions, but:

I was thinking of getting a '92- '97 VFr 750, and cutting it up to try and turn it into an adventure style naked bike. The roads where i live are not fit for sports bikes without engine guards underneath and softer suspensions, and I love the old gear driven cams and the VFR engine in general.
I've seen a load of VFRs from that era with front mounted radiators, Is that stock? Side mounted radiators are kind of ugly once you get the fairings off. If I had to move the radiators, would some cutting and welding for mounts work or is it more complicated? and to put them up front, I don't think both would fit, when I switch them out, how do I make sure it won't overheat? Is there a value for how much heat a radiator can shed that I can rely on when looking for a replacement?

Stock ground clearance is 130mm, For our roads maybe 150-180mm, with front/rear wheel travel 180/170 mm respectively from stock 140/130. Do you guys think raising it like that would massively affect handling? Even if i keep the weight distribution as equal as possible?

Was thinking, since I'd be raising the bike anyway, and fabricating a one off rear end, maybe i could pass a single exhaust pipe the tail. How can I be sure the heat won't affect the tire? is there a minimum clearance I should know about? Maybe switching stock 17" front and rear wheels for 16" lighter ones to increase the distance between them?
And would heat wrapping just the section under the seat work to avoid melting the tail end, or would it be better to wrap the whole system up?

Thanks in advance, and sorry if my questions sound stupid. I think it'll be easier once i have the bike in front of me, but I don't want to rush into it, buy the bike and start cutting unless I know my ideas are possible.
Ed.
 

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Is my bike ok?
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15,025 Posts
Hey man, welcome in! An adv/touring VFR would be awesome. There's going to be plenty of writing that will need to be hidden, but that's not too bad. Moving the radiators isn't so bad. As long a you put them in an area that they aren't either sitting directly against something or you having turned them sideways (90 degrees) then you'll be fine. Not super critical.

As far as raising the bike. Typically there no extra height to be had on the front end. If you want to go up in the front you need either longer fork legs, custom top clamp( to allow sliding the forks down). Iirc, some VFR's run clip ons above the top clamp. If you go to standard bars you might be able to use that extra amount of fork protrusion for your rude height.

If you are wanting to raise the bike and go adv/,touring style, then 16" tires seems counterproductive. Go 18 rear, 19 front so you can get some real tires ( for your intended purposes) and raise the bike at the same time.
 

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Isn't as dumb as he seems
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Oh, and before you discount side mounted rads, look at Cookie2000ad's VTR build.
To add...

OP, if you actually plan to use this bike the way you plan to build it (for adventure riding), side-mounted radiators probably make more sense -- less likely to get fucked up by rocks and caked with dirt and stuff.
Not that that's some terrible problem with a front-mounted one or something (if it's even a "problem" at all, you could make a bigger fender), but side mounted does seem to make more sense here, to me...
But I know nothing so don't listen to me lol. Really.
 

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Oh, and before you discount side mounted rads, look at Cookie2000ad's VTR build.


If you were really going off road with side rads you'd want protection for them since they would be pretty open to getting squashed in a tumble. BUT a VFR with a big alu bash plate and a tubular crash cage around the rads would look pretty fookin....... rad.

Like these on this Multi:

 

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The friendly Ghost.
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Most dual sport tires that I have been looking into are coming in the 19" front and 17" rear. You probably don't want to go down on wheel sizes as that makes rocks and bumps impact a little harder.

If you're going to be pushing this bike hard, you should be looking into a set of knobbies or 50/50 dual sport tires. Good grip is very useful when you end up somewhere you aren't use to. (Gravel, sand, mud, snow, ice...)



As for moving the radiators, you want to have some good airflow to them and direct 90* on is the best. However, it is suggested that you use a radiator guard to prevent rocks from puncturing them and that you have some crash protection for them.

If you choose not to move the radiators, defintely build a cage around them to prevent crushing them in a fall. Remember, without your radiators on a liquid cooled engine, you aren't getting home.



Raising the front and back equally shouldn't cause any issues as long as the chain doesn't grind on the swingarm.

To raise the rear easily you can get raising links and a longer shock body. Remember that the stiffer your suspension is on the rough dirt, the harsher the ride and the more slide happy your bike may be.

To raise the front easily, you can move the clip ons from above the triples to below the triples (not recommended) or remove the clip ons and install risers for dirt bike bars (recommended). Reason the first option isn't recommended is that it lowers your upper body making it harder to lift your ass of the seat and ride in a standing position.



You may also want to lower your foot pegs (you now will have added ground clearance due to raising the bike) as this will assist in standing up as well and helping your legs act as better shock absorbers for your body.
 
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