Custom Fighters - Custom Streetfighter Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title says I have some carbon fiber that I need to glue.... my SV-650 has a Carbon Fiber tank and the attachment to where the tank gets attached by the front tank mount is starting to separate.. I want to know what I should use to attach the main frame onto the front tank mount.. I don't have pictures but I can get them hopefully soon. I was thinking some kind of epoxy but I'm not sure I've never worked with Carbon fiber before. Thanks in advance.
 
G

·
If the tank is carbon fibre it will have been originally made with either epoxy or polyester resin so thats what would be best for a repair

i cant see the job & dont know which was used but if you can get some resin into where its cracked & can clamp it until its gone off you may be able to make a decent repair, if the area is out of sight you could also strengthen it with glassfibre
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My bad, The part that is breaking apart isn't the actual tank its right here


Here are a couple of close ups of the cracking
http://s1355.photobucket.com/user/Goalie94/media/2014-05-19200553_zps429b7f5b.jpg.html?sort=3&o=4
The white bit is where its already cracked


A pic from the other side


And another pic from on top.


I ended up buying this epoxy called Loctite Marine Epoxy and I was going to squirt some down in there and then use some clamps or something to apply pressure to the tank while it sets. I don't know if I need to take the tank off and do it that way let me know what you think is best. Thanks
 

·
Ridin Dirty
Joined
·
377 Posts
Man that looks sketchy as hell ! Does gas slosh out when you hit the brakes? :O
That really looks like it needs a 3 layer patch wrapping up the tank a couple inches and all the way forward to bolt down on..of course you need to glue and clamp it first. But it looks like they mated a top shell to that bracket instead of making the top shell and bracket one piece. If fuel is leaking out, you may want to use SLOW jb weld to glue the seam back together. I don't know what marine epoxy you have, but if you laminate layers of new cloth, you need epoxy that's thinner than syrup.. it is best to sand a 60 grit texture wherever epoxy is applied. make sure the surface is free from paint also. Use brake cleaner to clean it if gas has left residue..

When you fix that, you ought to see why this is happening and if rubber isolators directly under the crack can rest on the frame to take some bouncing and weight to help out the bracket.
 

·
Habitual bike builder
Joined
·
300 Posts
Pretty much echoing the sentiments of guy…

The tank is made from epoxy, polyester or vinyl ester resin…most likely vinyl or epoxy due to the tensile strength and chemical/water resistant properties.
Problem you have is that the tank and mount were made in 2 separate pieces and then bonded together…The bond is not strong enough to withstand the weight of the tank with fuel in it jumping around like a pole dancer…should have been designed in one complete unit..

“squirting” anything down will not really be doing a good job. You need to prep any surface when it comes to composites..

You need to rough sand prior and make sure that you have resin/carbon exposed not crap like the old bonding stuff left in the join….and clamping force will be needed to ensure a good bond….

Not to dishearten but I feel regardless, it will happen again unless you also fix the inadequate engineering design..

I would make machine cnc mill or what ever a piece that gets bolted down with the mount but carries over and forms onto and contours around the tank, looks like you have enough meat to do this (the lip), I feel this will help support the bracket and take a lot of load off it…and if adventurous with the design you could cut/mill a groove in it to make it continue under the support and under the tank to further over engineer it…

Key factor to over engineering, it makes you find the next weakest point
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Man that looks sketchy as hell ! Does gas slosh out when you hit the brakes? :O
That really looks like it needs a 3 layer patch wrapping up the tank a couple inches and all the way forward to bolt down on..of course you need to glue and clamp it first. But it looks like they mated a top shell to that bracket instead of making the top shell and bracket one piece. If fuel is leaking out, you may want to use SLOW jb weld to glue the seam back together. I don't know what marine epoxy you have, but if you laminate layers of new cloth, you need epoxy that's thinner than syrup.. it is best to sand a 60 grit texture wherever epoxy is applied. make sure the surface is free from paint also. Use brake cleaner to clean it if gas has left residue..

When you fix that, you ought to see why this is happening and if rubber isolators directly under the crack can rest on the frame to take some bouncing and weight to help out the bracket.
Gas doesn't slosh out at all, As meagain1 pointed out its two separate pieces that were joined together afterwards. I was thinking about taking the tank off using some sand paper to get a rough surface and then put the tank back on the bike and using some ratchets to secure the tank down and use Epoxy in the area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Pretty much echoing the sentiments of guy…

The tank is made from epoxy, polyester or vinyl ester resin…most likely vinyl or epoxy due to the tensile strength and chemical/water resistant properties.
Problem you have is that the tank and mount were made in 2 separate pieces and then bonded together…The bond is not strong enough to withstand the weight of the tank with fuel in it jumping around like a pole dancer…should have been designed in one complete unit..

“squirting” anything down will not really be doing a good job. You need to prep any surface when it comes to composites..

You need to rough sand prior and make sure that you have resin/carbon exposed not crap like the old bonding stuff left in the join….and clamping force will be needed to ensure a good bond….

Not to dishearten but I feel regardless, it will happen again unless you also fix the inadequate engineering design..

I would make machine cnc mill or what ever a piece that gets bolted down with the mount but carries over and forms onto and contours around the tank, looks like you have enough meat to do this (the lip), I feel this will help support the bracket and take a lot of load off it…and if adventurous with the design you could cut/mill a groove in it to make it continue under the support and under the tank to further over engineer it…

Key factor to over engineering, it makes you find the next weakest point
Thanks for your information!, I wish that I had a machine to mill out a metal piece that would get bolted down, unfortunately being in college I don't have much at all. Would this be something that I would want to take to a bike shop and get something designed to keep it from breaking again or how good do you think the Epoxy will do by itself?

Crazyish Idea which might look good and would probably also reinforce everything?
 

·
Just Here For The Party
Joined
·
696 Posts
My bad, The part that is breaking apart isn't the actual tank its right here


Here are a couple of close ups of the cracking
http://s1355.photobucket.com/user/Goalie94/media/2014-05-19200553_zps429b7f5b.jpg.html?sort=3&o=4
The white bit is where its already cracked


A pic from the other side


And another pic from on top.


I ended up buying this epoxy called Loctite Marine Epoxy and I was going to squirt some down in there and then use some clamps or something to apply pressure to the tank while it sets. I don't know if I need to take the tank off and do it that way let me know what you think is best. Thanks
That looks like a welding bead in the close up photos. Are you sure it's a carbon fiber tank and not just a wrap?

The mounts are starting to pull away from the tank base which needs fixed, but if its just a wrapped tank, then you'll have an easier time repairing everything. If it is a full carbon fiber tank, then it will just take more prep work and a more careful approach as everyone has stated.

The big thing to remember is to thoroughly clean all the surfaces to be mated together. If you can find it 3M makes an automotive panel bonding compound that is as strong as a weld when it's applied properly. Something like that would be my first choice for such a critical repair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That looks like a welding bead in the close up photos. Are you sure it's a carbon fiber tank and not just a wrap?

The mounts are starting to pull away from the tank base which needs fixed, but if its just a wrapped tank, then you'll have an easier time repairing everything. If it is a full carbon fiber tank, then it will just take more prep work and a more careful approach as everyone has stated.

The big thing to remember is to thoroughly clean all the surfaces to be mated together. If you can find it 3M makes an automotive panel bonding compound that is as strong as a weld when it's applied properly. Something like that would be my first choice for such a critical repair.
Yeah its a full carbon fiber tank, I ended up taking it to a shop since I was driving somewhere like 2 hours the next day, didn't want to take a chance
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top