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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm doing some window shopping on the Honda website and am curious about the major differences between the aforementioned bikes, besides the 100ish difference in engine displacement. Would the ride on ether be substantially different between them, especially for a newer rider?
 

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i cant fart
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2 completely different bikes man. The 500 is a twin, the 600 is an i4.

Suspension is completely different.

Brakes on the 6 are ridiculously strong, the 5 is a single caliper in the front so not as strong

The 500 is a great 1st bike, u should look into the "f" model instead of the full fairing. Looks much better (factory naked) and not as many being made as the full fairing so more "exclusive"

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Elbow Grease is Cheap
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I'll add to what the good Dr said. the 500 should be quite a bit cheaper as its more focused on beginning riders and built to a certain price point whereas the 600 is a race bred machine with more expensive suspension bits and technical wizardry.

go with the 500. It will be more beginner friendly and more friendly on your wallet. as a beginner, you really wouldn't be able to tell *much* difference between the handling of the two.

also, per your other thread about shorter riders, the 500 has a lower seat height. Perfect for instilling confidence in new riders. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Doing some digging around the internet and I'm liking the look of late 20th century CBR400 & 500. I'm definitely looking to go used for my first bike so an older model might be kind of fun. Any suggestions of an expected price point as the $6,500 specimen on eBay seems a bit steep?[/URL]
 

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You should be able to do a lot better than that if you're willing to take one a couple years old.

It's kind of odd that Honda used the "CBR" prefix to the more relaxed 500, which typically just got "CB" prefixes. The new CB1100 for example. The CB"R" always went on the fully faired supersport models.

500's are to me the perfect beginner size. People get bored with 250's usually within the first week and they're just too small and slow for highway duty. 450s/500s give some "room to grow" so to speak, yet are still light, easy to handle, and the power is smooth and useable and won't overwhelm a newbie. Plus as said, a modern 500 should be able to hit 100 or a little better if pushed, so you're not pinned just to keep pace on the highway. A 250 will struggle to maintain 75.

In contrast the 600 makes virtually no power until about 10k rpm, at which point you hit the powerband and shoot off at warp speed. They're tuned for top end power where the 500 is tuned for a broad, even spread(at the expense it makes about 1/3 of the peak power of the 600)

If you're in S. glens falls you're only maybe 30-45 min from me. If you want help looking at bikes in the area let me know.
 

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In that case it makes more sense....

I learned to ride on a 1982 GS450. The dorky semi-automatic one. I didn't wreck it and am still here, so I guess it's good for beginners. It was no rocketship but it would hold 75 on the highway without much issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

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The only 400/4s imported to the US in the late 80s or since are the CB-1 and the FZR400. The others are all grey market imports.
 

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CBR400's are cool, but I can't understand why that one - a well maintained but somewhat beaten up example of a 1990 bike - is expected to raise that much $$

In the UK you'd maybe sell that for £1500 and be happy you got that much.

To the top poster, get the 500, it'll make you a better rider. You'll ride the wheels off it and get experience of what happens to the edges of motorcycle performance, ie when you're doing more than the suspension can manage or the engine can't give any more. The brakes will be good enough, but not lock too easily and the lower power will enhance confidence.

I miss my old CB-1's for all these reasons, it's fun when you can do more than your bike, and give it at least 8/10ths on every ride, rather than my Fireblade now which doesn't get past 3/10ths from one month to the next.
 

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If you are thinking you can compare these two bikes face to face, then you need the 500. The 600 will eat you for lunch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If you are thinking you can compare these two bikes face to face, then you need the 500. The 600 will eat you for lunch.
Duly noted, after some research and guidance an RR is definitely not meant for a beginner.

There seems to be quite a few late 80's CBR600F Hurricanes around here, most for right around that sweet $1,000 mark. How does the community feel about those for a good beginner bike that can be kept around into the intermediate range? I do a lot of highway driving so want something with enough power to keep up with traffic in the 75MPH range and something that I won't want to trade in at the end of next summer. That and I'm getting some great ideas for a chunky looking Hurricane fighter.
 

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By buying an old bike you'll be buying into all the issues owning an old bike, which will have been tended to by many enthusiastic but usually ham-fisted and often cheap-assed previous owners. However, by paying so little, you'll be happy to tear into it.

As far as usability and durability go, get a decent one and you'll be golden.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
By buying an old bike you'll be buying into all the issues owning an old bike, which will have been tended to by many enthusiastic but usually ham-fisted and often cheap-assed previous owners. However, by paying so little, you'll be happy to tear into it
I'm not too worried about repairs and maintenance, I'm actually kind of looking forward to them. This first bike will be a test platform for me to learn all of the basics of repair, maintenance, building and riding on before I move on to something more powerful and complex.
 
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