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UnicycleMode
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7,569 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So how many of us continue our riding education? I'll go ahead and break down a few ways that we as riders can improve our Street Fighter experience and have a safer and more enjoyable ride. It's not difficult and can take as little as a vacant parking lot, first gear, and little practice.



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-Parking Lot

It would be here that we find the most basic of places to practice braking maneuvers, quick stops, blind spot checks, evasive swerves, and overall get a much better feel for the bike. Nobody is going to kick you out of a parking lot as long as your being quiet and not lifting wheels and acting crazy, there are much better places for that, I'll cover that further down the page.

Braking can be the difference between you and a turning car, learn what your brakes are capable of, even if your rolling 8mph and stamping on them as hard as you think you can until you feel the front tire getting spongy and goofy. Not all parking lots are created at the same time, so managing to hit a few of them a month and practicing with different "road surface" helps alot. Recognizing what your brakes on the full on limit feel like as a street rider can make all the difference in the situations that you get into riding the street.

Warm tires and painted line braking and cornering practice can make a huge difference too, but, it is something you have to ease into after alot of practice, getting to a point where you are comfortable going deeper and deeper into the lean at low speed and feeling the different feedback as you pass over painted lines can give you a good feeling of "traction management".

A bunch of further education type books like Proficient Motorcycling cover all of this in great depth!


-Track Schools

Another place to turn when your already a practiced rider and looking to further your bike control ability and further your enjoyment of the ride is a Track School. They are offered at almost any venue that offers motorcycle track days. The merits of a professional rider teaching a proficient rider to further the level of bike control one possesses are unmeasurable!

When was the last time you came into a corner and that nagging voice in the back of your head was telling you that your going too fast? A track school can put an instructor there to teach you what you are and are not doing to get the most out of your machine in a given situation. The education from a track school is invaluable to a street rider in ways you can only imagine by attending one for yourself. Sure they are not cheap, sure you can just go to a track day, but the education from a 1 on 1 with an instructor is priceless in street survival!


-Track Days

When your a well educated rider the temptation to exploit your riding ability on the street is difficult to pass up. A twisty section of perfect road temps any good hooligan to perform at top level, it's the track that for a few hundred bucks and an afternoon will allow you to get that "flickin' the bitch" type riding without the harmful results of errant cagers and debris on the streets. Not to mention the camaraderie of 10 bikes, all knee down through a 90mph sweeping corner, with no cares in the world aside from how soon out of the apex your going to be getting on the throttle and how much.




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As builders and riders of Street Fighters we are a dime breed! We are looking for the utmost out of our machines, we want everything surrounding brutal, second to none performance to be perfect, how about ourselves?! With all the riders that have gone down this season, some by lack of education, some by no fault of their own what so ever, how many of us pursue further education? How many of us hit the parking lots around the area every so often? Do you attend track days? Ever been to a track school?

I further myself at every turn, give my 150% to the ride and the bike and I am just wondering, how many of you do the same?




-RatFighter
 

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******* Dumbass
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5,796 Posts
This is something I've wanted to hit fpr quite a while now:

The 1-DAY CIVILIAN MOTORCYCLE
BASIC, INTERMEDIATE, AND ADVANCED
taught by the Sherrifs Dept at Dublin, CA.


Fee: $150.00 ($50 rental fee for motorcycle)

Cash or check due at beginning of class. NO CREDIT CARDS

DESCRIPTION: This program is designed to teach basic riding skills to students. This training covers much of those skills taught to police motor officers. It is a highly tactical and defensive training environment, and very challenging.

The program is taught by professional experts who have been teaching police officers for decades. We have married the unique and special skills from police motorcycle training with those taught on the outside to provide the most varied and complete training found anywhere.

Most accidents and collisions can be avoided. The tactical skills, advanced defensive driving components, and tactical evasive techniques that are taught to police officers are now being offered to the public. Learn the secrets that keep motor officers alive.

BASIC Class - You will learn the elements of proper turning movements and proper emergency braking techniques. This class is challenging and not recommended for beginners.

INTERMEDIATE Class - You will learn to make "TIGHT" turning movements, emergency turning movements and advanced emergency braking. You will also learn proper turning and stopping and pull out techniques on inclines.

ADVANCED Class - "Intermediate certificate required to enroll" Includes all of the elements of the BASIC and INTERMEDIATE classes, but takes them to a more advanced level, equal to basic police enforcement riding skills. "This class is extremely challenging"

RENTAL MOTORCYCLES: All rental motorcycles are retired police Kawasaki KZ1000's. The rental allows you to use the motorcycle at our facility only during the time of the class.

PRESENTATION HOURS: This is an 8-hour course that will be presented at 0800 and end at 1700.

PRESENTATION DATES: See below.

RESERVATIONS & LODGING: This course is limited to 12 students and reservations will be made on a first come, first serve basis. If you need information please call Vickie Swensen at (925) 551-6970.

REQUIRED EQUIPMENT: Students are required to have a valid motorcycle license or permit. Certified D.O.T. helmet and eye protection, over the ankle boots and good quality gloves. NO SHORTS.



LOCATION: The course will be conducted at the Alameda County Sheriff's Office, Regional Training Center, 6289 Madigan Road, Dublin, CA.

LODGING: Reservations for lodging must be arranged by the student or his/her agency.

Schedule:

NOTE: If the "Seats Available" indicates zero, you can still
submit a registration and be added to a "Stand-by" list.

Available class dates /Seats Available



May 23, 2010 (Intermediate) /9
May 29, 2010 (Advanced) /12
June 26, 2010 (Basic) /5



I'd probably rent one of thier bikes so I don't care if it hits pavement.
 

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Not So Newbish :)
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122 Posts
Ya I do it. I read books and practice in parking lots. It helps a lot to know your machine and the limits. The next thing I want to do is a track day class. I've got to save money for that one. The closest one to me is Las Vegas Motor speedway. They have a good school, but costs up to a grand.
 

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ShamanFighter
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22,340 Posts
I WANNA hit up the track here but i dont have monies for gear or tires...:oops:
 

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Buell Fighter
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2,114 Posts
There is nothing like the track.

I also put emphasis on reading. Find someone that fits y our style of riding. I would personally recommend Keith Code's Twist of the Wrist to ANYONE wanting to improve their riding skills. Nick Iensatch is also a very good writer and teacher.
 

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******* Dumbass
Joined
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5,796 Posts
Wow That Would bE really neat to go do ... not to far away either intereting
I've been threatening to go for the last 3 years and never made it. Still want to. The chance to ride the LEO Kawi's and know I can dump it in a pinch is cool. The Deputy I first talked to about it said "Be prepared to fall".

There is nothing like the track.

I also put emphasis on reading. Find someone that fits y our style of riding. I would personally recommend Keith Code's Twist of the Wrist to ANYONE wanting to improve their riding skills. Nick Iensatch is also a very good writer and teacher.
I have all of those books. Love em.
 
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