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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My brother has been urging me to take his '98 1200S for a spin for weeks now, I finally caved under the pressure yesterday and it reminded me why I am a force to be reckoned with on a big bike, and why I have a serious addiction to the famed 1157 air/oil engines. :D

I pulled out of my driveway and it all became familiar, like I had never taken a break from big bikes at all (I blame my years riding like a complete psycho on one for what happened next) because when it was all said and done and I was back home I felt like I had never even left, like it was walking to the fridge for a beer or something as routine as opening the window shades in the morning. It was like a second skin to be one a 1st gen Bandit 1200. :)

Not really sure how many of you can/do ride power slides on bikes, it DOES take a massive level of skill to pull off tire smoldering 2nd gear ******* out of corners and even more so to break it free in 3rd and ride them out as far as the gearing and rev range allows, but it was something the slippery city streets catered to when I had a Bandit over 5 years ago... so it was like a time machine to put a leg over the mighty B12 on the east side of the cap city again!



I pulled up to the intersection down the street to leave my home behind and strike out a small city route, leaving the stop sign I rolled the throttle on, set my lean angle, and rode into the throttle breaking the rear tire free and riding out a Rossie style power slide into a wheelie, clicked 2nd gear like it had an air shifter, and set down the front end smoother than the sands of the Sahara. :nuts:

The rest of my ride was full rev range 1st gear power floaters, backing it in everywhere there was a chance, and overall riding like I had never taken a break from it at all. Something about 5 years of dirt riding, ice riding, hooliganism, a supermoto for a season, and more liter class machines than I think I ever wanted to see under me in my lifetime were huge contributing factors to my comfort level, BUT, I think it was also that little nugget in your brain that says with such confidence at the best times possible, "No worries! You've totally got this.".




The one thing I kept thinking about while riding the Bandit was... and bear with me here...

"This thing feels soooo damn underpowered! No wonder I'm turbocharging mine!" :mom:


I feel like I have transcended into a monster incarnation of a motorcycle enthusiast that craves inexplicable power numbers that threaten to rip limbs from the body under acceleration alone. :letsride:
 

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hate us cuz they ainus
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Not really sure how many of you can/do ride power slides on bikes, it DOES take a massive level of skill to pull off tire smoldering 2nd gear ******* out of corners and even more so to break it free in 3rd and ride them out as far as the gearing and rev range allows, but it was something the slippery city streets catered to when I had a Bandit over 5 years ago... so it was like a time machine to put a leg over the mighty B12 on the east side of the cap city again!
and balls

im almost there. i can start hazing the rear coming outta certain corners. but as im sure you know, its a little different doing it on a 600
 

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UnicycleMode
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
and balls

im almost there. i can start hazing the rear coming outta certain corners. but as im sure you know, its a little different doing it on a 600


Waaaaaay different. Having done the whole, "I can paint black marks out of corners.", thing on almost every single bike I've ridden I can say a 600 super sport is one of the most challenging to time the hit of the top end power with the lean angle and speed. Sometimes you get it just right (as you are probably doing) and as the bike is up-righting out of the apex point you are hitting perfect on the power curve slipping rear end all the way, others you are smack dab in the middle of the punch of power and it just wants to leave a nasty check mark on the road and a skid mark in the leathers too! :D

The awesome thing about the Bandit is the bottom end grunt and the ultra linear power curve. You can just roll the throttle on and feel for the rear end to break free and ride out the loss of traction without much of an issue at all. Closest I've found that can do that exact same thing is the 05-07 GSXR1000 in "map A", the power is linear enough that you can just roll it on and let the lean angle do the work to upset the rear tire and from there you just ride harder into the throttle like the Bandit to feed it more wheel spin as the speed increases.

My DRZ will do it too on the 17's, but it takes some serious commitment to get that crazy with the lean angle and throttle input. I honestly found it far easier to just get to that threshold limit of lean angle and THEN push it with the throttle until the rear end broke free, but after that you can fan the grip like a psycho and it didn't seem to make much difference in how it behaved sideways once it had the slip angle set.
 

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hate us cuz they ainus
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Lol, nailed it! Mostly the latter though. Sometimes I find shifting from the inside to the outside foot rest right as you hit maximum lean angle helps to break it loose too. Which is kinda weird.... you'd think it would be the other way around.
 

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I been craving a v-twin sport bike, saw a buell 1125CR yesterday and that thing was rolling thunder. Like you could feel the exhaust thump your chest as it rode by, it was high gloss black sex on wheels.

Inline engines are bullet proof powerhouse dogs but all the top end is pretty overkill on the street. I miss the powerband of the meanstreak 1500 i sold, that thing could haul plenty of ass but it was fun just to tractor it around chopping. One thing that really sticks with me about inlines though is how smooth they run, throttle response is instant and it just clicks into gears so smoothly that downshifting and upshifting is some sweet lovin.

Sounds like it was a sick ride, ive never drifted out of fear that rear is just going to keep sliding, takes balls and skill!
 

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Admittedly my skill level is nowhere near rats mastery of the b12 but I have been known to get it sideways and on occasion loft the front end while smoking the rear tire (mostly on accident) but once your butt hole unclenches you feel like king of the world and you just want to do it again... Its the reason I love the bandit so much and hope to one day be able to replicate some of the stories of triple digit wheelies and general hooliganism...your stories were a major factor in me getting a b12 so its good to see your back on the horse tearing it up

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lol, nailed it! Mostly the latter though. Sometimes I find shifting from the inside to the outside foot rest right as you hit maximum lean angle helps to break it loose too. Which is kinda weird.... you'd think it would be the other way around.
I find the same technique applies when turning a wheelie as well. I was kind of surprised when I got on a light weight enough bike to find that it worked like that. I am pretty sure it has to do with the way we weight the chassis despite where we feel our weight is really at.



I been craving a v-twin sport bike, saw a buell 1125CR yesterday and that thing was rolling thunder. Like you could feel the exhaust thump your chest as it rode by, it was high gloss black sex on wheels.

Inline engines are bullet proof powerhouse dogs but all the top end is pretty overkill on the street. I miss the powerband of the meanstreak 1500 i sold, that thing could haul plenty of ass but it was fun just to tractor it around chopping. One thing that really sticks with me about inlines though is how smooth they run, throttle response is instant and it just clicks into gears so smoothly that downshifting and upshifting is some sweet lovin.

Sounds like it was a sick ride, ive never drifted out of fear that rear is just going to keep sliding, takes balls and skill!

I've never been much for the inline four bikes myself due to that ungodly top end, but always lusted after simplistic parallel twins and inline triples due to the ease of riding them hard. It's far more fun to blast a twisty road on a twin than any four I've been on. As much as I would love to swap to a ******** and a gsxr cam set in a Bandit I just couldn't bring myself to sacrifice the massive mid range pull, and the fact it actually drops off at the top rather than build up into the rev limiter. :D


Tires make a HUGE difference in how it behaves getting sideways. Some tires will go greasy and slippery the instant they are abused, others get ultra sticky and will wheelie up at pretty deep lean angles after they are hot. I find sport touring tires tend to be the best split between grip and slip if you are going to ride rather hard on them expecting some tail end action on dry asphalt. The Perelli's my brothers Bandit sports at the moment are aged pretty bad but once the rear heats up a bit it has pretty consistent grip, after a few slides down into corners on the brakes it wouldn't break the rear free on the power without getting REALLY unhappy about it when it hooked traction back up.

My Michelin Pilot Power's (circa '07 when they were relatively new to the market) would heat up and produce some incredibly bad wheel chatter when backing it in on the sacked out rear shock of my first B12. I hope an Ohlins unit cures that shit on my fighter build though.




Admittedly my skill level is nowhere near rats mastery of the b12 but I have been known to get it sideways and on occasion loft the front end while smoking the rear tire (mostly on accident) but once your butt hole unclenches you feel like king of the world and you just want to do it again... Its the reason I love the bandit so much and hope to one day be able to replicate some of the stories of triple digit wheelies and general hooliganism...your stories were a major factor in me getting a b12 so its good to see your back on the horse tearing it up

I dunno if you could call it mastery of the B12 as much as an all around skill set that I've been building on for over a decade carving through the horrendously slippery and often wildlife populated back roads of Wisconsin, as well as riding twisty gravel roads at speeds unlikely to be believed, and jumping hill crests like a mad man gone off the deep end. The Bandit 1200 just caters to such behavior in a way that nothing else has. ;)

The first time I got bat shit sideways on my first B12 was in the rain, it got a little slip going and feeding it more throttle it was like a 400hp turbo car on bald tires! Once it broke free you could just keep it going dictating slip angle with throttle application, and coming from a drifting background I knew exactly where it was leading to in a big way, next thing I knew I was out every time it rained, and then when it was dry, it just continued as I had a good feel for what the bike was going to do under me. Ice racing didn't hurt anything when it came to a steady gain of skill sideways. After my crash in 2008 I got into riding a 100+hp 600 super sport on ice, and that was a game changer through and through. I suddenly was completely fearless about getting sideways anywhere on anything.




I was digging through old footage the other day and came across some of the legendary triple digit hill crest footage as well as getting sideways on a corner exit coming over some road sand/salt from the winter months. Hell, the lake was still frozen during the ride too! The high speed hill crest where the GSXR1000 is catching up to me was indicating 140 on my speedo and 158 on the GSXR. I expected the wheelie, the guy on the other bike, not so much! He nearly shit his pants a few times during that ride. :D

 
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