Custom Fighters - Custom Streetfighter Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,

Been an observer for many years, but finally got around to joining. After having lots of bikes built by others, I've just completed something I can call my own. Shame it doesn't handle very well just yet. Got it fitted out with tele's for the summer and will have another crack at the funny front end next winter.

Stephen
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ad seems to have been pulled. Its showing up in a google search for GPZ Gumtree Rosyth, but when you go onto the page it takes you to nationwide GPZ ads. I had a gumtree ad pulled a couple of weeks for putting mobile number in wrong place!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,726 Posts
Welcome to CF Stephen! Repping you for great intro & picture of your GREAT bike! Dang....that's some fine work you do! She's BEAUTIFUL! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks guy, much appreciated. It’s been a lot of work.

It’s a FJ12 with a Daytona rear end and a Hossack style front end. I was determined to have matching wheels, but also determined to have sensible tyre sizes. I took a Daytona rear wheel, sliced it down to 108mm from the front facing rim, milled the cut flat to about 105mm, milled a 30mm shoulder on the circumference of the wheel, then turned a replacement rim from a 470mm dia billet of 30mm thick aluminium plate. I had to build the mill to mill the wheel, and modify my lathe before I could do the rim.

My lathes a little 1949 Myford 3 ½”, with a 2” chuck capacity, but fortunately a real heavy cast iron bed. I was able to mount a VFR400 swing arm from its bedplate, mount the 470mm slab on that, and chain drive it from a sprocket in the chuck to get the required cutting speed. With a ½”HP single phase motor I could only scrape a thou at a time or else it would jam. There was about 200 hours machining in the front wheel along, but I loved every minute of it.

If I knew it was going to work I could have paid someone with a bigger machine to do it, but didn’t know how much of a shoulder I was going to get until I started shaving it away and could make sure there was enough metal left in the casting.

I managed to achieve a close tolerance fit, and got the wheel into the rim nice and square by heating the rim in the kitchen oven, and jigging it up until it cooled.

Lee down at Steelheart in Kent very kindly welded it all up for me, and on collection let me see it all running true on his monster lathe. I wish I had machinery like that!!

I could then start work on the drop arm to the wheel, which is currently grossly over engineered and aint at all pretty, but good enough to make an attempt at riding it up the road.

All in 18 months work, evenings only.

Was determined to make the Yorkhill Easter Egg run, so too a week off my work to get it rideable. 9 days were spent in the shed from 8AM to midnight, but an MOT was achieved at the end of it.

The painful truth is although it was rideable, it handled incredibly nervously. It felt like it was always trying to pull to the left, which I’m in no doubt at all was down to the imbalance of weight across the drop arm down to the wheel, but banging the tele’s back on I realised the drop arm is about 2” too long throwing the geometry all out.

I’ll debug the basic bones of the bike over the summer with the tele’s on it, and fabricate another shorter drop arm, and have worked out a way to balance the weight across the steering axis, so hopefully next summer I should be able to make some shows in double single sider mode.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,726 Posts
You've got skills there & fabrication skills are so important for modding-up awesome bikes! Had to rep you again. you remind me of someone near & dear to me. :)
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top