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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been seeing a bunch of ads on CL and people saying their mileage on their odometer is not the actual milage because they went -1/+2 setup. Now I can kind of understand how that works but how far off is it really? Say you ride 1,000 actual miles how many miles would your clock say you went?

I'm curious cuz I have a -1/+2 setup that was on my r1 before I bought it and the rear sprocket was really torn up so it had been on there for a while. So in kind of curious to try to figure out my actual milage
 

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Elbow Grease is Cheap
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for a lower gear/better acceleration setup, rough guess would be to add 10-15% to the mileage. unless they had a pie-plate sprocket, then it would be more.

Not much of an issue. Better to check chain and sprockets for wear and general condition.

If they didn't take care of the chain, what other maintenance was not performed?
 

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Basement Fighterer
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I'd check your speedo speed with a cell phone (gps). Find what % it is off and that should be the % your odometer is off. Although some bikes have the speedo programmed to read high but the odometer reads correct.
 

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Based on gearingcommander.com numbers, it looks like 89.5% or so for the -1/+2. (89.5% of odo = actual)

For every 1000 miles on the odo, the bike would have actually traveled 895 miles with that setup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
for a lower gear/better acceleration setup, rough guess would be to add 10-15% to the mileage. unless they had a pie-plate sprocket, then it would be more.

Not much of an issue. Better to check chain and sprockets for wear and general condition.

If they didn't take care of the chain, what other maintenance was not performed?
I went through the bike when I got it the only I haven't checked is valves and they wouldn't even be due to be inspected if the odometer was correct. The rear sprocket was trashed I think it had like 3-4 teeth left on it. But the rest of the bike is A ok

Most older bikes have a speedo drive off the front tire so its unaffected by gearing. I know older triumphs and a few other had speedo driven off the rear tire.

Sent from my SCH-R720 using Motorcycle.com Free App
Mine runs off the speed

I'd check your speedo speed with a cell phone (gps). Find what % it is off and that should be the % your odometer is off. Although some bikes have the speedo programmed to read high but the odometer reads correct.
I was thing of doing that cuz the dipshit I bought it from put a 180 on the back instead of a 190 that 2 stickers and the manual says it needs on it. Just to see how much my speed was off just because of the tire.

Based on gearingcommander.com numbers, it looks like 89.5% or so for the -1/+2. (89.5% of odo = actual)

For every 1000 miles on the odo, the bike would have actually traveled 895 miles with that setup.
That's more of what I was looking for thanks mike. So by that and the condition of the last sprocket I'm guessing that I'm really around 18-19k not the 22.5k it reads now
 

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180 on the back instead of a 190
That changes things more then.

Instead of 1000 odo equaling 895 actual, you are down to 1000 equaling 882 actual (180 tire and -1/+2)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The 180 was installed right before I got it. It had less than 100 miles on it when I bought the bike but now after my shanangans it's just about toast so ill be putting a 190 on then as soon as the zx is done she's getting a 200 and track clothes on so she can be full time track whore
 

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Well, saying the bike has "less" miles than actual is either true or false depending how you look at it. What do you count as a mile....one mile of physical distance covered, or a "mile's worth" or wear and tear on the engine/driveline/bearings/ect? If a bike has been geared down, then yes, the bike has physically covered less distance than indicated by the dash, but the driveline has the indicated amount of wear on it, which is generally what people care about from a bike's mileage. If a brand new bike moved 100k miles on a trailer but the dash said 0 would you consider it a "high miles" bike? Didn't think so.

I've found factory gauges tend to over-read the speed by 7-10% (yamaha's digital speedo's are by far the worst offenders here), but the odometer/mileage is within a percent or so of true. The speedo and odo use the same speed signal, but are calibrated differently. So if you use a speedo-healer to correct the dash speedo, your odometer is now actually slow. For older cable drive ones, accuracy varies widely. Keep in mind they are calibrated for stock tire sizes. Different widths and aspect ratios will affect accuracy, and a 190/50 in one brand isn't identical to a 190/50 of another.

On my Z it's set at -11%, with the +2 rear and compensating for factory error. The speedo is bang on accurate against a gps, but the trip meter/odometer reads about 10% less than actual miles traveled.
 

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lɐʇuǝɯᴉɹǝdx&#4
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I dunno about that. Wear on brakes, suspension, tires, etc doesn't change with gearing. If you geared +1/-2, you'd end up with fewer indicated miles, but probably the same engine wear and MORE clutch wear.

Lower gearing may be easier on the driveline, so for the same indicated miles, I'd expect less wear. Total hours of opperation or maybe gallons of fuel burned would perhaps be a truer measure of potentiel wear.
 

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That's what I was getting at...it's kind of a vague measurement. Open to interpretation.

Buying used would be a lot easier if engine hours could be displayed though the dash. Virtually all EFI bikes record this, but it usually can only be seen through dealership software.
 
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