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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello there. Can anybody here tell me if is it normal reading 30 Volts on the motorcycle regulator? The motorcycle is a Suzuki SV650 year 2000. Disconnecting the output cable, I read on my multi meter that I am getting around 30V DC, this voltage drops down to 14V when connecting the battery to the regulator output. So is it normal getting around 30V when the regulator is only connected to the ostator and there's no any load because it's not connected to the battery.???

By the way, I am new here, sad because can't determine what's the problem with my bike. If wanna still reading...

The first regulator was giving even less than 10v on the output, so I determined that it is bad and need replaced. The ostator seems to be ok, I am getting around 80V AC at 5RPM, and 1.2 ohms. I ordered a new regulator from amazon, and saw that it was giving around 30V DC on the output. Thinking that it was bad, I ordered a new one, and I had the same problem, so I ended trying 2 brand new items. What should I do now? Any ideas? Thanks.
 

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Disconnecting the battery from the R/R with the engine running can quickly ruin the rectifier- same reason you should never undo the battery in a car with the engine running- the voltage spikes and fries the alternator's diodes (that convert the AC it generates to DC output) very quickly.

If you have 14v across the battery posts, sounds like everything is fine. Your stator output and resistance also seem in line with normal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
@RaZed1. Oh really? I did not know it! :oops: That did not make sense to me before, but I am going to be careful with that next time. Anyway I have to say that just maybe I just solved the problem of my motorcycle. A guy from yahoo answers told me that it is normal reading 30V when no battery connected, so crazy, maybe the answer is that the battery acts as regulator of there's something inside the regulator that adjust the output once a battery is connected. Then what I did was to connect the brand new regulator, and did let the motorcycle run in idle a couple minutes. At the beginning the engine sounded very poor, almost defective, then I supposed this was due to the battery being in low charge, but I also thought, does this matter now that a good regulator is connected? because the engine was getting the energy from the regulator, so I did not suspect that the battery was the cause. I let the motorcycle run about 20 minutes, and finally the motorcycle begins to sounds so good, at full power, no more defective engine sound. :rock: Sorry if my English sounds a little weird, just a mexican trying his best. Thanks a lot!
 

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welcome in mate go say hi in tha welcome area. Join up and hang around a while OK :rock:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everybody, :rock:. Actually I am not happy at all, I am still having problems with my motorcycle... it seems like the new regulator is burned now, just like the first one. I was riding at high RPM, but not going to the limit, I mean, my bike has 13K rpm, and I was around 10K just for the first gear, then keep it around 8K. I detected a pattern when the regulator was unstable at high rpm, I did hear a buzz sound, very little, then few minutes later, the bike was totally fucked, no power at all and I had to move off the road and then park. I can ride the bike, it can be turned on and ride a little, but at very low powered, it sounds very fucked, no engine damage, but just low voltage feeding the system because of the damage regulator, I think...

I am very noob with all this. So trying determine the problem, is very hard. I think that there are two options for my regulator failing. The first possibility is that I had bad luck and the new regulator came defective, it worked so good few days, but now is burned. The second option is that maybe the ostator output is giving abnormally very high voltage, so the regulator cannot handle that big energy, this going worst when I am at high rpm because the ostator will be generating even more energy, right?

I tested the ostator few weeks ago, I was getting around 80V ac At 5K rpm, and the impedance was around 1.2 ohm. What you recommend me to do now? was the maximum voltage for the ostator?
 

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Hi and welcome .Sorry to hear you are having problems with the charging system on your SV.Is a known problem on gen 1 SV 650.First things first make sure your battery is good.Charge it up then let it sit for an hr or so then check static voltage.Do a load test on battery also.Take it to a shop to get it tested.Check stator all 3 wires to ground should be insulated from ground.Check ohm reading between all 3 wires also.Should be around .5 to 1 ohm ish don't worry if its a LITTLE higher ,different meters read differently.If all good so far you can check stator output on all 3 wires, all should be 70vac + @ 5000rpm.Check wiring connections,battery ground etc.Have battery connected and see what the output is across the + and - terminals with bike running ,high beam on and @5000rpm.See if its above static battery voltage,usually between 13.5 to 14.5 v or so.There is a test for reg /rectifier also but you will need a manual for that.Speaking of which would be a good idea to get one for your bike and everything you will ever need is in it!!Good luck in your quest.Electrical problems can suck ass to find!!!If you find out your reg/rec is fried good idea would be to upgrade to a mosfet type reg.Check the internet for details on that mod.Hope this helps a bit!!
 

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The R/R on the first gens are super problematic. They should always be replaced with a retrofitted MOSFET R/R like the ones on newer CBR600/100RR's. The problem occurs when the factory R/R doesnt get sufficient airflow underneath the tail plastic to keep itself cool. They overheat and fail. Then they send way too much current to the starter relay and the stator and fry them both.

Check out SVRider.com and look up the how to sections or the FAQ section on how to replace your R/R with that of a MOSFET unit. MOSFET R/Rs run much much cooler and more efficiently. After having to replace my R/R, stator AND starter relay, I never had another issue with my charging system. It can also ruin your battery so keep an eye on that as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey thanks you both guys. Some time ago I recorded a video where you can hear how the motorcycle sounds when the problem is present. It sounds very weird when you pull up the throttle, like a little clamp sound, please can take a look at it and determine a problem just by hearing at how it sounds?

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdGoBhLq4ls

Somebody told me that the problem may be one bad spark plug. I replaced them but the problem is still there. Please see the video and let me know if do you have any idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think that there's no doubt that the stator is malfunctioning. Today I removed the battery and externally charged it, in order to have it at its 100% capacity. Before taking out the battery, I saw how its voltage was around 12.7V, which apparently was not enough energy to properly run the system (it runs, but malfunctioning, poorly). So I externally charged the battery to its maximum voltage capacity, which was around 13.2V, I put the battery in and saw how now the motorcycle works and sounds simply amazing. Less than a volt less and it won't be able to properly run. I know that with not stator all this is going to stop working properly once the battery drops its energy level.
 

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A conventional 12v lead-acid battery has a standing voltage of 12.6 of so when fully charged. It may read higher than that for a short time after being on charge (such as if the bike was running), but given a few hours it will settle back down to 12.6.

Most ignitions will function normally down until 10v or so- they need to function under the load of cranking the engine. Below that the ignition will get weak and often cause running problems. If you have a fully charged battery and have a charging system failure, most bikes will run for an hour or more on battery power alone before any symptoms are noted (typically, rough running, leading to a stall and then there's no juice to turn the starter).

Have the battery load tested. I think it's bad. Voltage is a poor indicator of charge. A battery may appear to have 13v just after charging, but put a slight load (like the headlight and ignition system) on it, and the voltage may suddenly tank to like 8v, insufficient for proper running, where on a good battery it might only drop a volt or so. Bad batteries can pull too much current from the r/r (cooking it), which in turn can cause the stator to burn out as well.

Stators can be tricky to test as well. I had one in my Vmax that passed the voltage and ohm tests, but under electrical load, it would heat up and fail, resulting in great voltage when first started, that steadily declined until by about 10 minutes in it was doing virtually nothing. I replaced it, and the problem was solved.
 
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