Custom Fighters - Custom Streetfighter Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've embarked on a project to lighten my '09 ER6n. This was precipitated by a garage knockdown that dented the tank, and my feeling that the bike seemed to carry 30-50 lbs of excess weight. Also, I always hated the look of the seat - like a whale flipper or a giant banana.

I decided to experiment to see whether radical cutting, grinding, paring and parts swapping would improve the feel of the bike, and whether the bike would still look good. In other words, would form follow function? Here's where I am now:

The first to go on the block were the footpeg brackets. These are beautiful castings, but they weigh nearly 5 lbs each.


I managed to get them down to less than 2 lbs (at least the left one):



Installed:
[

Here's how the right side turned out (the brake fluid reservoir is a small one from another bike clipped to the brake line):


I removed this boat anchor (about 7 lbs):

and replaced it with this (1/16" aluminum, later braced with angle stock - holds the ECU, a Ballistic battery and the grip heater components):


Like this. The aluminum panel fits snugly against the bottom of the seat pan, so not much water will get in there (just all over my back):

Since I removed the radiator cowls, I installed a coolant reservoir in the battery box. The Ballistic 8 cell battery saves another 7 lbs.

I kept the stock instruments, but switched to a Vrod-type headlight (uses the same bulb connectors as the stock headlight). It's about 2 lbs lighter than the stock headlight and brackets.


I'm not much of a painter, but at least I got the dents out of the tank, and got the bike together enough for a ride (which turned out to be muddy, due to our Spring thaw conditions). Before and after, mud and all:





The seat pan (made of ABS plastic) and pad (skinned molded foam) are from Legendary Motorcycles. It's not as comfortable as stock, but I will probably get used to it in time. Pad looks good, anyhow. I still have some appearance improvements to make where it meets the tank, I think:



In the end, I calculate that I saved about 40 lbs. I've got a 60-lb box of body parts, nuts, bolts, brackets, etc., on my hands. Most of it will go to eBay.

The bike feels great, and runs like a champ after its winter sleep.


In conjuction with all this, I changed to a Progressive 428 rear shock and spring and installed Race Tech fork cartridge emulators and new front springs, and added a high-flow air filter. Aftermarket exhaust might be next.

I later added a Yoshi exhaust. Another 8 lbs off. Impressions: Not much louder than stock, but much deeper and more motorcycle-ish. I'm running the DB-reducing insert. Increases peg vibes a little, but that might be due to my cut-down peg brackets. Seems to provide much more power, after ECU remap.





I wasn't getting enough light from the Vrod knockoff headlight, so I decided to try an '82 Suzuki GS1100E light I had in the shop. This is the famous 9" monster that was only available on a few bikes in the early 1980s. Yamaha used a similar one on its Seca 650.

I painted the bucket silver, beat a few dents out of the trim ring, and installed a few pieces of servo tape in various places to tighten up potential rattles. Now seeing and being seen is more certain. Also, it makes the rest of the bike look smaller.

The old light:


The new one:




With garage-mate Ninja 250 for comparson:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
I prefer the Vrod light by far.... but function is pretty important there ;)

Is the versys swing-arm lighter? I think so... might be something to look into. Changes geometry a bit too, raises the back end... so it'll turn in a bit quicker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
I agree about the light, IMO those huge round things don't really look good on anything. Some of those ebay knockoff lights come with or use crappy HS1 bulbs that are only 35w...a standard 55/60 h4 bulb will drop right if you fold the two forward facing index tabs flat and dramatically improve the light (did this on my Grom, which came with a 35w bulb, the h4 made a huge difference).

Otherwise, looks great. Bet it handles and goes a lot better without all that extra fat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
I actually like the big round light it helps the gauge cluster not stick out like a sore thumb
Bike is kick ass mate keep up the good work
Rw


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Newbie
Joined
·
537 Posts
that legendary "phat" tail looks great on your bike. I also preferred the vrod light, but my bike is my main vehicle so I get the need for better lighting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I made a few changes recently, in preparation for making a new seat, and shaved another pound off the beast. I was happy with my original idea of locating the coolant recovery tank in the battery box, but after I removed the stock exhaust, I had room for the tank around the front part of the swingarm, since there was no longer a muffler under that area to overheat the tank and its hoses. This allowed me to stuff the Ballistic battery, the ECU, and most of the wiring into the battery box, which moved that weight lower in the bike, allowed shorter, lighter battery cables, and removed the need for the heavy stock ECU mounting bracket. The Power Commander fits under the fuel pump, and everything is now more centrally-located and closer to the ground. I also have a free hand to design a new seat and tail section. I'll let you know how that comes out.

In the meantime, here are some pics of the change:

The coolant tank in the swingarm. It's an aftermarket rectangular 16-oz container with a molded-in nipple on the bottom. It came in white with mounting tabs, which I cut off for this application. It's almost exactly the size of the stock battery, and so fit nicely in the battery box (I guess that means that the stock battery would also fit nicely in the swingarm, but that would raise a few other issues)

You can also see here how the rear brake fluid reservoir clamps onto the brake line:


The view from underneath the swingarm. The coolant tank is a wedge fit, but I riveted an aluminum bracket underneath for extra security:


The new rat's nest. The battery and ECU are under there somewhere. The important thing is that nothing projects above the top of the frame rails, so I can use part of the stock seat pan:


Now there's lots of room under the tail section. The square black thing is the controller for the heated grips. The relay can be seen under the left side of the fuel tank mounting bracket:


Power commander peeking out from under the tank. Grip heater relay to the right of the tank bracket in this photo:


Then, I made the new seat. I wanted to improve the look of the front of the seat, where it wraps around the tank, return to the softer foam of the stock seat, and to lighten the bike even further. I also wanted a simpler taillight and license plate mount.

I made an entirely new aluminum base, a plywood and fiberglass seat pan, foam cushion, and cowling. The Legendary molded foam pad was not uncomfortable, but it was so firm that it transmitted a lot of road and engine vibration.

The new seat is 3.5 lbs lighter than the one I had before. I made it by using the front part of the stock seat pan, fiberglass-coated plywood, the stock foam (recountoured), and part of the stock seat cover. The cowling is part of the original Legendary Motorcycles Phat Tail seat pan. Some pics:

Here's the frame with everything relocated forward (into the battery box and under the tank)


The new "fender," which is riveted to the frame. Its sole purpose is to shed water and act as a place for a hold-down for the back of the new seat. It's 1/16" aluminum plate:


The new seat pan coming together on the bench:




Test fit: Not bad, but I'll need new tank panels:


New fender/taillight/license mount. It's a thinner piece of metal bent and riveted to the pan and battery box:


The finished product, with the new tank panels:

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,225 Posts
If it needed pigeon-holing, I'd call it a café fighter and I'd say the big round headlight looks great for the style, the seat and the clocks :)

Can't be much weight left to save?? Any more plans or are you there, now?

The versys arm is indeed a bit lighter, and also looks better to my eye. Might mess with your coolant tank though. If it's right that it raises the rear it may also balance the bike a bit visually, the tail is quite low.


 

·
Custom bikeporn addict.
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
It looks like your coolant reservoir overflows directly in front of your rear tire? Seems potentially dangerous.

Love what you've done. The stance is awesome with either headlight. Liking the new tail.

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It looks like your coolant reservoir overflows directly in front of your rear tire? Seems potentially dangerous.

Love what you've done. The stance is awesome with either headlight. Liking the new tail.

Bob
Nah, the overflow exits at the original location. That hose in the bottom is the inlet from the radiator.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top