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I do gooD?
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720 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm learning how to weld took a class at a local school and have messed around with a little lincon weld pak 100 mig. The little mig can't really do anything thinck. So iv been looking on Cl for other welders. I came across an old Sears/Craftsman 230/140 Ac/Dc. Guys asking $50 for it what do you guys think about it?
 

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Registered
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118 Posts
I don't know much about welders, but sears/craftsmans is kind of a low grade hobbyist type welder from my experience. But for 50 bucks it might be worth a shot.
 

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re-tarded
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1,283 Posts
It's most likely a capable welder, but for motorcycle work you'd be better off with a 230v MIG.
 

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I do gooD?
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720 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
its not really going to be for bike work, for bike work i would love to get a nice mig.
 

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Vtwin
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3,945 Posts
For $50 the craftsman will rock the fuckin house until it pops, go for it!


Sent from Motorcycle.com App
 

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I do gooD?
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720 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
sent the guy a message tonight hopfully I get it tomorrow.
 

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I bang metal
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2,779 Posts
stick welding is for mainly industrial type stuff.... if you have to you can use it for anything because it is pretty much the most versatile process (meaning there is an electrode for most applications). Do yourself a favor and dont rely on one type and size of electrode, learn what you can when you can and just keep doing it. there is a channel on youtube called welding tips and tricks and he has alot of good info on all processes, positions, and materials
 

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Is Lame
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19 Posts
i have a pretty good feeling i have the same "buzzbox" you're looking at.. i learned a ton on that thing and though you can't do super thin shit ( at least stick.. ) you can do some nice structural and weld aluminum with 5356 AC rods. ( they burn fast fast fast)

if its the one with the handle on the front that you slide vertically to control amperage, i can attest to it being a solid machine. thats a "movable core" transformer and varies current by differential flux density.. quite literally it moves the magnetic core in the transformer in or out of the coil array.

you CAN convert to tig, although it'd be scratch-start.. but its better than nothing. you can also find a "high freq" box on a welding forum or supply shop (or... somewhere) and use that coupled with the AC output and a tig conversion to do aluminum, although that too would probably be scratch-start and touching tungsten to aluminum instantly contaminates it. theres trade offs, but for $50 its a fucking good deal pretty much no matter what. i'd rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it. my tig rig has replaced my buzz box, but i still have it.
 

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ill fighter
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18 Posts
I'm a welding teacher, with over 11 yrs in the trade, if u wanna do it right get a miller mig machine, I have a multi process millermatic mig/tig, mig for tacking, tig for dobbin out some pretty beads, u don't wanna play around with that buzzbox, it's junk bro, trust me, I'm a professional.
 

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lɐʇuǝɯᴉɹǝdx&#4
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3,516 Posts
Buzzbox is fine for what its good for, which is heavier welds with lots of penetration. And at $50, its a crazy bargain; you can probably pull out the copper windings and sell if as scrap for more than that.
 

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0.o i didn't do it
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1,892 Posts
Honestly Buzz boxes will get you by plus you can also run a scratch start rig rig of it at lower heats. Yeas a Miller setup is nice if your gonna drop 2-4 grand on a setup. Practice is what you need most. Look around and I'm sure down the road you'll find a better setup at a good price. There are plenty of people here the can help you get going with what you have if you r on a budget. To be honest if you want a machine that will help you put together bike projects with minimal hassle then mig is the absolute easiest way to go. Mig allows you to set speed and heat at the machine with out you physically having to keep speed and feed at the right rate for heat. That come to you from some one who has 17 years plus field experience in the welding trade. Trust when I say find what your comfortable with first.
 
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