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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How would you Triumph owners rate your bikes in the scale of easiness to do power wheelies? As I've told before my last bike was a 91 cbr600f2 which was ridden over 100tkm so the tranny was so worn out I didn't dare to wheelie it having exploded one ns125r gearbox while popping one up. So this summer I've been trying to learn how to wheelie on my Daytona and it has proven to be a bit of a handful. It does get it up with the throttle only, and I don't even have to blip it to flip it, just a quick twist and off it goes, but the problem is that the power delivery is so brute it wants more to jump up than gradually rise which makes me to flinch and chicken out every time no matter what mindset I'm in. I can pop lil wheelies but to do a proper 10 o clock, no way hose. I suppose there's no real shortcut to happiness here and I just gotta practice practice practice but it does feel to me like there are other bikes with more linear power output that would be much more easy to learn on, I feel I've been sat straight on the black stallion with a hefty slap on the ass instead of the pony I thought I'm getting....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well as it stands I'm currently at a point of barely skipping over a standing beer can with the front wheel, to be able to keep it up you'd first have to get it there to begin with. I guess I just have to get past the spook, it's just so violent when going up. I've watched several videos of people doing power wheelies on jap fours and it more or less rolls gradually opposed to the slingshot type jump my bike wants so do. The other problem is that the triple only revs 10,5k so in order to not hit the limiter you'd have to be quick about it anyways.

I guess my main question was to anyone that owns one of these that how would you compare wheelying your triple over other bikes you've done it with.

To make things worse I've always sucked at wheelying bicycles as well so I guess I just gotta practice more...
 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yG3FovOm3AY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6n0LP_nV3yA

I'm no expert and I have a different bike BUT...I was trying to find some footage of a decent wheelie just to see. Not that these fellas are experts either. But they mostly seem kinda sketchy exactly like you describe. Like this here ^^^. And otherwise an odd absence of anybody "killing it" on a 955 daytona. Considering how popular it's sister is for the application...

Perhaps raised bars would help. Either drill the triples and do the fighter thing or some kind of them raised fighterish clip ons. Make it more speed triple spec. If you havent done that part already.

Some bikes do not have a good balance point or body positioning to be confident wheelie bikes. In which case the best advice is just dont hurt yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·




As seen in a few other threads, my bike is pretty damn far from the stock Daytona riding position. I've been trying to learn after posting this but I just have to admit I don't have the cojones to do a full flip on this bike. As said before I'd reckon it to be a fairly challenging bike to wheelie, it has the goods to deliver, it just delivers them in one big blow which makes me chicken out. I guess I just have to keep practicing until I get past the fear...

Also I've heard that the Daytona engine is placed as far forward as it will go to make it NOT want to wheelie but instead take off really quick which it surely does.

That first vid is dead on exactly what I'm getting, a nervous jump with a quick landing, so I guess I don't just suck at it, it IS a hard bike to pop a good one. Not to mention learning to do it.
 

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It is really a matter of throttle control. Even as aggressive as the 955i is, you can use that aggression to your advantage much like clutching a wheelie. My 893cc CBR900RR was a total handful to wheelie, it was just.... nothing, nothing, nothing, GO OVER BACKWARD. It took a steady hand and a bit of practice to get comfortable having to be pretty much wide fucking open to just a sliver of throttle "catching" it when it was up far enough to keep it there. The biggest issue I ran into with most liter bikes as well was that there is such a steep learning curve to getting it right that it can feel really discouraging. I've honestly noticed riders that started out on a 1000cc superbike doing wheelies, and never had experience with anything else, tend to suck at wheelies on smaller bikes due to the effort it takes to get a smaller bike up.

If you have the money to buy, or access to a dirtbike of any sort, it helps greatly to learn on something that is taller, lower power, and in turn more forgiving. I would rather replace a fender on a dirtbike than have an "oops" moment on a street bike and write the entire thing off due to one mishap learning wheelies.


If all the above fails, just practice, practice, practice. The smoother you can get them up and let them back down the more confident you will be, the higher the font will rise, and eventually like Dr J said, the rear brake will play a part in how far you can maintain them by slowing them down and controlling the behavior of the bike.


Good luck! When you learn to clutch them in 2nd gear you will be wondering how it was ever difficult in the first place. It's just like riding a bicycle, once you know how to wheelie it never leaves the memory banks and you just automatically go through your check list in your head and put front wheel to the sky!




I'm to a point (after years and years) of practicing 2nd gear coasters on the rear brake (it is a TON of fun!! :D), but I use a XR100 for the training stuff so I don't have to deal with busted plastics on my big bikes.

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the good writeup! Yea I guess I just gotta practice until I get it right. Right now the problem is the temperatures took a plunge and it's looking a lot like this season is pretty much packed so probly getting back to this sometime next april-may ;)
 
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that seat isn't going to be the most helpful for powerwheelies from what i can see at least. then again I can't sit on it and make that judgement call.

if you are doing lowspeed powerwheelies the 955i will feel like it's bucking you off when you gun it when you are leaned back. get a good rolling start a tad faster than you are now and just apply the same principal. speed will help, also harder to get it up. No pun intended :shocker:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
^ this. Some weeks back when I was riding home from taking the truck to a repair shop, needless to say red hot pissed, some grandma was doing 65kph on a 100 area in front of me, I waited for the oncoming traffic to pass, gunned it WOT, redline, upshift, clutchbomb+WOT FUUUUCK! It didn't go that high and I had to bring it right back down cause I was totally unprepared and therefore on a straight trajectory to the field on the left but it was my first high speed wheelie, think I was doing around 90 and rising when I wheelied past the granny. So as I suspected the bike does deliver, I'm just not being enough of a dick about it. Thinking of fitting a quick twist throttle in the winter as I now am starting to understand the complaints of the handle travel being too damn long.
 

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Google Kevin Carmichael and checkout the images they are nearly all Triumphs , he also runs a wheelie school:robssmilie:
 

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The 955i is pretty violent, especially at low speeds. I'm still working out some fuel mapping. I have a slight flat spot between 2500 and 4000. So, low speed wheelies is what I can do. Higher speeds it flattens out. Now, it's definitely too cold to ride. So, won't be figuring anything out until spring.

Like Rat said, the 900RR was similarily violent, but manageable. My ZX6R was stupid easy to control. All in all, practice, practice, practice.
 
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