Custom Fighters - Custom Streetfighter Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to relocate my regulator on my 2006 GSXR because of its inherent overheating issues. I wanted to relocate it away from the engine and more towards the center of the bike where some overheating issues might go away. The one problem I have is how long the wires are. The regulator's stock location put it behind the radiator and I am able to get it as far back as mid engine. Is there a simple way I can entend these wires? I am extremely unfamiliar with electrical DIY so I am at a loss of knowledge.

Should I just make longer wires and fashion the same connectors that the stock wires have? so make a long set of wires with the stock connectors from the stator and the same from the other wires on the regulator? I am not even sure if this makes sense... haha.

Bike: 2006 GSXR600
Regulator: Rick's Motorsports aftermarket design
 

·
Jarhead Supreme
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
You could splice in an extension. To do it right, I would suggest enviromental splices or you could use butt splices. It's proper to only use one inline splice per wire as you want the least amount of potential failure points. To do that, you would need a spool of wire, probably 50ft or so, splices, pins and proper crimpers for those pins. Most people do not have that tooling.

Right way: cut the connector off with enough wire left to extract the pins. Then splice on your extension wires, find where you want to place the box, cut to length, strip, pin, test, voilà!

Other way (not recommended but doable). Cut the R/R harness about a foot back, or where it's workable for you, splice one end of the extension wire to the main harness, strip the other end of the extension and the wires coming off the box and then splice those together. So basically you woukd have a splice from the main harness to the extended wire, and splice from the extended wire to the original wire coming from the R/R.

I'd just pay me to do it XD
 

·
Fuck it, let's do it live
Joined
·
3,993 Posts
Why not solder?
 

·
lɐʇuǝɯᴉɹǝdx&#4
Joined
·
3,516 Posts

·
Is my bike ok?
Joined
·
15,025 Posts
Solder is an inferior mechanical connection when compared to a PROPER crimp.
Electricity flows only on the surface of a conductor. Solder provides massive surface area vs a crimp.

The only mechanical flaw to solder is vibration resistance. But crimped ( and therefore work-hardened) copper fails just a badly.
 

·
Jarhead Supreme
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
Let me clarify, for multi conductor wires , which we use most, the skin of each conductor (there is usually 7-15) provides the electrons for current flow. Solder is a poor conductor, and when you solder all the conductors together to create, in essence , one solid conductor , you have reduced the surface are of the wires and it's conductivity.

In the scheme of things, this is a marginal difference. Same for terminations, if done right, a crimp or solder connection should perform and last for a while if done properly.

Solid core is good for signals and stranded wire is good for carrying current.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top