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Just Here For The Party
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Re: Taper attachment-tool

Already sidetracked. Classic build-off. :D
Now it needs three months of silence interspersed with posts saying "I'm still here." or "this is going to get finished." and then two weeks of panicked, furious building.
 

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lɐʇuǝɯᴉɹǝdx&#4
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Turned an (external) taper today in a lathe a bit smaller than the one Shinyribs has. No taper attachment, had to use the trammel, which was limited to a bit under 2" travel. Like he says, it's a pain in the ass, more so the bigger the part. Should be a big help for those axles!
 

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2bonnes
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39 Posts
Checked my lathe cross feed and it disconnects with just one screw to a block that has the cross screw going through it. So I dig that part of the plan, but not all of it. lol How is the shaft you are using (fork tube) attached at the lathe head end for adjusting the taper amount? I know I'm dense.
 

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2bonnes
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No problem you are doing good explaining it. So one end of tube attaches to those plates you clamped to the bed near the tailstock? And the opposite end attaches near the head? So the tube is at a angle to the bed ways and as the carriage moves the tie rod piece pushes/pulls the cross slide?
 

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Is my bike ok?
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
No problem you are doing good explaining it. So one end of tube attaches to those plates you clamped to the bed near the tailstock? And the opposite end attaches near the head? So the tube is at a angle to the bed ways and as the carriage moves the tie rod piece pushes/pulls the cross slide?
:thumbsup: Nailed it.
 

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2bonnes
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Cool, thanks for the instruction. I have seen them on machines but didn't think really needed it but it could be real handy for some projects. Didn't understand the process before your project.
What is neat about these old manual machines is the rather simplicity of them being able to make really complex tooling and parts.
Another thing is being able to use these tools to make tooling to make other tools!
I also have a 1940s mill three-quarters size that is very versatile. Bought a rotary table that is really handy for curved cuts.
Thanks man, be watching this to conclusion.
 

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lɐʇuǝɯᴉɹǝdx&#4
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So, this doesn't look anything like tha taper guide on the big lathe at the shop....

Looking at it more assembeled now, I figured it out, but bonneblktrk has a rather elegant explanation. I was rather wondering how you were going to manage a tool holder on that piece of round stock...
 

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2bonnes
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What did you use for the "bushing" that slides on the tube? You machine that? Pretty close tolerences huh?
 

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Is my bike ok?
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
What did you use for the "bushing" that slides on the tube? You machine that? Pretty close tolerences huh?
Hunk of aluminum with a brass sleeve. Pressed the brass in before machining it. I rough cut to within .005" of the tube OD, then made a final, clean pass to match the ID of the follower to the OD of the tube. From there, I just kept polishing the brass until it slipped on. Moved free, zero slop. I cant say that was the correct way, just what seemed right at the time. As far as a measurable tolerance, sorry, I didnt actually measure the finished product.

Main reason I really wanted to use something like a fork tube. I've seen guys online use steel tubing or round stock, but I'm trying to get as precise as possible. Just trying to keep the follower from chattering along the tube and making the tool holder jump around. Im not a good machinist, so I want the equipment to be as good as possible to give me a fighting chance. :D
 

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2bonnes
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That seems like the proper way to do it. Good idea getting it close and then slowly polish it to get good fit. I know a machinist and he does that too. I just muddle along slowly and things usually come out usable, haven't had to scrap any parts yet. Although having a TIG welder helps! To save the part for a few bobos that I have had.

I assumed you used a fork bushing, but what did you use for the brass. Ya that has to be close fit because movement would transmit right to the cutting tool and give a poor finish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I just muddle along slowly and things usually come out usable
:LolLolLolLol: That's a very accurate description of most all of my ''machining''.

I assumed you used a fork bushing, but what did you use for the brass.
No fork bushing, just pressed a piece of brass out of my scrap pile in to a piece of aluminum. I made those two pieces a 0.001" press fit, but I knurled the brass piece before I pressed it in to position. My thought was to ensure a solid connection between the two. Probably not needed, just what I did.
 

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2bonnes
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Well, still pretty dense. Why two tie rods, thought just one would be needed, but now I see your sliding piece on the tube could rotate and change the distance the tie rod actually is setting, and move cross slide erractially? What am I saying? I don't know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
You're not dense, it's just my goofy design. :D

I'm using the heim joints so they will absorb any discrepancies in height between the crossslide and the guide rod. I'm sure that my bedway and my guide rod aren't running perfectly parallel, this should account for this and prevent any type of binding. I figured if there was only one heim joint on each end that it might not pull accurately. I thought it might trail,so to speak, if that makes sense? So I triangulated it to stiffen it laterally. One heim join on the follower, two on the cross slide, but only one tierod in total.

Discaimer: I'm totally winging this as I go. :LolLolLolLol:
 

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2bonnes
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Thanks, I see. Be neat to see your next step completed on the tie rod. Is it and the mounting block material brass?

No apoligies needed: I design things like that too, think most do. I make sketches with tolerences I need to hold to fit new part and add to them as I go. But at completion so many notes on it can't make sense of it any longer! So not much good to use to duplicate another part. Should make drawings with measurements after I am done, but don't! lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Lol. I hear ya. The tie rod tubes are steel and the mounting block is aluminum. The heim joints are mild steel. 7/16" at the follower ,3/8" on the mounting block.

The two at the mounting block are not solid, they are the urethane bushed type. That's good for sealing out chips, but now I'm wondering if it will allow it to slop around? Ready enough to swap them later if need be.

Hope to finish up the tierod tonight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Well, still pretty dense. Why two tie rods, thought just one would be needed, but now I see your sliding piece on the tube could rotate and change the distance the tie rod actually is setting, and move cross slide erractially? What am I saying? I don't know.
Darn. You hit on a great point that I totally didn't pick up on.

I cant use a heim at the follower. It will ( um...is ;) ) just flop and rotate. I'll have to make a solid end for that point.

Good eye bud, too bad I wasn't smart enough to pick up on what you said. :D
 

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2bonnes
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Thanks for the compliment. You would have figured it out anyhow.

I was guessing you were going to use two tie rods one on the top and one on the bottom of the sliding bushing. That would prevent it from rotating. But might be complicated to hookup to cross slide without binding.

Sometimes another set of eyes pick something up. I was just trying to picture the motion of the pieces.

That looks great. You are a good machinist and tool designer. What kind of welder do you have?

Have you tried it yet?
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Thanks for the compliments! My MIG is a Hobart Handler 240. I still need to cut the slot on the opposite plate for adjusting the guide rod before I can use the tool. Not a lot of brainwork needed for that job, but ~18" of 1/2" wide slot cut in to 3/8" plate steel requires more motivation ( and time!) than I have right now. Hopefully soon,though!

I am anxious to get it up and running to see what kind of changes may be needed. Im still skeptical of the urethane bushed heim joints, but for they seem solid. We'll see if they squirm in use or not.
 
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