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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
the carbs on my bike are not looking so good, bits missing, mixture screws stripped the list goes on and on
expensive to replace if I'm lucky enough to find a set and parts are also hard to come by.
My bike is a hyousng comet 2006 125 that uses Mikuni BDS26 Double Types

I have saw a you tube video of some one with Yamaha 600 carbs on the bike but no other info...would any one like to hazard a guess of carbs i could try on my bike?

I fully understand Ill have to rejet and prob sit there for ages just to get her to run ...I refuse to give up since I have done so much work

here is a pic of her at the moment
[img=http://s32.postimg.org/53ss9o4q9/13124639_530472293806654_6437122678250153302_n.jpg]
 

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Carbs are complicated things but if you understand jetting then it's not so tough to swap from one to the next bike. Just be sure they're of a comparable butterfly size to stock so they flow the right amount. Problem you'll have is its a very small V twin, not many carbs about for a 62cc cylinder.

If you find another similar set you could just put your oem jets in. Beware that different brands of carb won't necessarily accept the other type of jets.

If someone already did it and it worked, copy them. No need to re invent the wheel.

I would imagine he used xj600s carbs. Each cylinder is 150cc so lots bigger than yours but having had two of those, the carbs are notably tiny for a 600.
 

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Fuck it, let's do it live
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Pretty sure the Seca II uses BDS26 carbs. Didn't click the link but I'm guessing that's the "Yamaha 600" being referred to, and the reason the guy went with that bike as a donor. You can find Seca II parts relatively easily, too. I don't think this would be a very difficult job to do, comparatively speaking.
 

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HipsterKillerGarage
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Carbs are carbs. The engine doesn't care which carbs you use and they all do the same job: create a/f atomization when air is pushed into them under a load.

The differences you need to watch for are diameter and spacing (sans single carbs).

If you can handle those things you can get this job done.

What I would do is search the net or eBay for the carb model and cross reference what other bikes had them.

That said you are looking at replacing used carbs with used carbs.

You'd do well to just rebuild your own, which will help you learn about carburetors and carb circuits, or just buy new.

This isn't rocket science, but it is something you should learn if you run a carb'd bike for maintenance and troubleshooting purposes.
 
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