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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I relocated my stock ignition switch (05 R1) after doing some mods and I'm looking to hide it better. I came across a low profile 3 position ignition switch that uses a round style key.. I'm curious because the stock switch goes from off to on which brings the lights on simultaneously. Can this 3 position switch be wired in a way to have the lights come on last as the switch plate indicates (off-on-lights)?? This would be perfect for killing the lights on a need to basis without killing the bike.
 

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sickboy
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dont see why not, just make sure theres no diode in the stock ignition for anti theft reasons.
 

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sickboy
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I am honestly not 100% sure what diode is in the R1 ignition as I have only done it on hondas. But basically how it works is this... Inside the stock ignition itself is a small diode, usually a zener diode (one way diode), a diode as you may know limits the amount of voltage allowed threw. So what the manufacturers do is make it so the bike only starts when there is a certain amount of voltage sent to the ECU. SO, you turn the key and 12 volts is sent the bike but only say 5 volts (a guess im not sure on the R1) to the ecu allowing the bike to start. This way if some bitch thief was to come up, cut the ignition wires and twist them together, 12v gets sent to the ecu instead of the needed 5v (again, just a guess) and the bike will not start (usually by not letting fuel pump run).
So basically if you switch to an aftermarket ignition all you have to do is put the correct diode in line with the wire from the ignition to the ECU and boom, bike will start right up.
A way to tell is either google and see if u can find the answer OR, put a voltage meeter on the wire from the ignition to the ecu and see how much voltage, ohms, watts etc is getting sent there and then go buy the diodes needed and give it a try. Their usually only about $1.99 for a 2 pack at radio shack.
 

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I am honestly not 100% sure what diode is in the R1 ignition as I have only done it on hondas. But basically how it works is this... Inside the stock ignition itself is a small diode, usually a zener diode (one way diode), a diode as you may know limits the amount of voltage allowed threw. So what the manufacturers do is make it so the bike only starts when there is a certain amount of voltage sent to the ECU. SO, you turn the key and 12 volts is sent the bike but only say 5 volts (a guess im not sure on the R1) to the ecu allowing the bike to start. This way if some bitch thief was to come up, cut the ignition wires and twist them together, 12v gets sent to the ecu instead of the needed 5v (again, just a guess) and the bike will not start (usually by not letting fuel pump run).
So basically if you switch to an aftermarket ignition all you have to do is put the correct diode in line with the wire from the ignition to the ECU and boom, bike will start right up.
A way to tell is either google and see if u can find the answer OR, put a voltage meeter on the wire from the ignition to the ecu and see how much voltage, ohms, watts etc is getting sent there and then go buy the diodes needed and give it a try. Their usually only about $1.99 for a 2 pack at radio shack.

You just described the function of a resistor, not a diode. Everything else could be correct. I'm not familiar enough with the system in question to argue that.
 

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sickboy
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You just described the function of a resistor, not a diode. Everything else could be correct. I'm not familiar enough with the system in question to argue that.
Yes and no. I may have been unclear. You are correct, a resistor regulates voltage but there are many kinds of diodes that do more then create a voltage check valve. A Zener diode as I suggested (which is the type of diode usually built into the ignition) is a semiconductor diode that in a sense acts as a one way voltage regulator so that you dont have to use a resistor in conjunction with a diode, you can get the same results with just one zener diode. Less parts, less hassle. And its not a diode with a built in resistor its simply a diode with impurities doped into the semiconductor to limit it to a particular voltage.
 

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Yes and no. I may have been unclear. You are correct, a resistor regulates voltage but there are many kinds of diodes that do more then create a voltage check valve. A Zener diode as I suggested (which is the type of diode usually built into the ignition) is a semiconductor diode that in a sense acts as a one way voltage regulator so that you dont have to use a resistor in conjunction with a diode, you can get the same results with just one zener diode. Less parts, less hassle. And its not a diode with a built in resistor its simply a diode with impurities doped into the semiconductor to limit it to a particular voltage.

Ok so you're talking about the diode being installed "backward" and using the reverse breakdown voltage to step the voltage down from the 12v to whatever the ECU wants to see. Yeah in that case I totally agree with everything you said. You just need to find out what the reverse breakdown voltage of the stock diode is and get one that matches.


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I really dont know how it works on an R1 but on suzuki's with this same sort of anti theft system there is a live from the cdi to the ignition which contains a resistor, when using a different ignition switch you take this feed wire from the cdi through a 100 ohm resistor & then directly to earth

just throwing it out there :)
 

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sickboy
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I really dont know how it works on an R1 but on suzuki's with this same sort of anti theft system there is a live from the cdi to the ignition which contains a resistor, when using a different ignition switch you take this feed wire from the cdi through a 100 ohm resistor & then directly to earth

just throwing it out there :)
Could very well be the case. Every manufacturer has their own method, but all the same general idea.
 

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Should just have to wire a diode inline, noting the orientation of the diode compared to current flow. There very well may be a resistor involved as well, I'm not 100% sure on the R1, but if you got me a wiring diagram I could describe it for you step by step how to do this.

BTW, a diode is a one way electrical "check valve". It only allows for the flow of electrons in one direction. A Zener diode acts as a normal diode until a certain voltage is reached, say 5 volts. Once this limit is reached, the Zener diode allows the flow of electricity to reverse. Just a minor note.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all the responses guys. That really does help. I've been out working on other parts of the bike and just had a chance to respond. I will hop on the Googley thing and see what I can find. Again thanks for the information.
 
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